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God's Faithfulness

 

God entered into a covenant with Israel. Repeatedly, however, Israel was unfaithful to God and pursued the gods of other nations. Amidst the betrayal, God promises to make a new covenant with them, which is eventually brought to fulfillment in the Person of Jesus.

 

 

Seventy Times Seven

 

We are all guilty of a great debt, sin. Yet, God has shown great mercy to us, forgiving us for our transgressions. Inspired by the Lord’s generous mercy toward us, we should forgive those around us.

 

Give Alms

 

As we celebrate St. Lawrence, we remember his great charity. Dedicated to the faith, St. Lawrence gave generously of his time and money. Emulate him today by giving alms, storing up for yourself a treasure that will not perish.

 

 

The Word of God

The Word of God is as sweet as honey. Both the prophet Ezekiel and the psalmist attest to this reality. Have you consumed the Word of God recently? Pray with Scripture today, allowing it to shape your life.

 

 

True Disciples

 

Jesus lays out the rules of discipleship. To follow Christ, you must deny yourself, take up your cross, and follow him. Of the three, which area needs the most growth in your life? Beg for the Lord’s grace to be a true disciple.

 

A Light in the Darkness

 

Happy Feast of the Transfiguration! Jesus revealed his glory to Peter, James, and John on the mountaintop. Like the light of Jesus’ glory, the Word of God is a lamp shining in a dark place. It shows us that God loves, knows, and cares for us. Meditate on Christ’s Transfiguration, allowing his glory to shine into any dark places in your life.

 

Presence Beyond Limits

 

The Lord's glory is beyond compare. During the Exile in Babylon, the prophet Ezekiel has a vision of God. Although Ezekiel is overwhelmed by God's majesty, the Lord reveals to Ezekiel that the divine presence is not restricted to the Temple. Rather, God meets us right where we are.

 

Faithful through the Ages

 

The First Reading from the Book of Wisdom provides a valuable lesson. Reflecting on the Exodus reminds us that we must remain courageous during our journey. Just as God was faithful to his promises and led Israel into the Promised Land, he too will be faithful to us as he leads us to heaven.

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“One thing have I asked of the LORD… to gaze upon the beauty of the LORD” (Ps 27:4 ESV). What the Psalmist longed to see, Peter, James, and John experienced when Jesus was transfigured before their eyes on Mount Tabor. In Sacred Art: The Transfiguration, Dr. Ben Akers and Taylor Kemp unveil the theological intricacies of Raffaello Sanzio’s The Transfiguration. Continue to plumb the depths of this great mystery and fuel your meditation with A Bible Study on the Luminous Mysteries: The Transfiguration.

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Nancy Pelosi trip to Taiwan

Three Navy ships—an aircraft carrier and two amphibious assault ships—operated off the coast of Taiwan to serve as a deterrent to any Chinese interference with her trip.

 

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I’ll quote Nat  Hentoff:

  Once the sperm and the egg meet, and they find a sort of nesting place in the uterus, you now have a developing human being. It’s not a kangaroo. It’s not a giraffe. It’s a human being. And that development in the womb until the person comes out is a continuing process. Therefore, if you kill it at any stage–first three weeks, first three months—you’re killing a developing human being.

 

 

TIME OF THE DAY

What  is your favourite time of the day?  Sunrise is filled with hope, midday a sort of lull between the activity of the morning and the afternoon.  Evening gives us a chance to wind down and reflect on the past hours, and then comes night offering us rest and the balm of sleep.  The truth is every day brings us fresh opportunities pleasures old and new, and the secret is never to be so busy that we do not see and appreciate the beauties and wonders

of this amazing world around us.

 

LAST WORD: Enjoy life, respect nature and don’t forget to think of other’s needs.                

 

NOVENA TO OUR LADY OF KNOCK – 14TH – 22ND AUGUST 2022.

Prayer to Our Lady of Knock

Our Lady of Knock, Queen of Ireland, you gave hope to your people in time of distress and comforted them in their sorrow.  Your have inspired countless pilgrims to pray with confidence to your divine Son, remembering His promise – “Ask and you shall receive, seek and you shall find.”  Help me to remember that we are all pilgrims on the road to heaven.  Fill me with love and concern for my brothers and sisters in Christ, especially those who live with me.   Comfort me when I am sick, lonely, or depressed.  Teach me how to take part ever more reverently in the Holy Mass.   Give me a greaterlove of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament.  Pray for me now and at the hour of my death.  Amen

 

LET YOUR HOPES NOT YOUR HURTS SHAPE YOUR FUTURE

 

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August 2022

The Diocese of Kerry gives permission to one religious congregation each year to promote their Mission. This year it is the Kiltegan Fathers and it is taking place here in Listowel on – 20th / 21st August.  We welcome our local man Fr. Tim Galvin who is at home on holidays at the moment who will be making the appeal on their behalf. The Kiltegan Fathers were founded on St. Patrick’s Day 1932, by Fr. Patrick Whitney, a priest from the Diocese of Ardagh and Clonmacmacnois. Since then, many Kiltegan priests, together with volunteer priests and; lay people from different Irish Dioceses, including Kerry have worked in Nigeria, and later in Kenya, Central and South Africa, Brazil and the West Indies. Today there are 223 Kiltegan priests of whom 40 are African. They have 58 students in Africa preparing for priesthood. The seed sown by the Irish Church has grown in surprising ways. We welcome Fr. Tim home and we are delighted that he will be joining us. His Mission Appeal will ask for your continued support for the Society’s missionary works,

 

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The Presbytery, Abbeydorney. (066 7135146)

abbeydorney@dioceseofkerry.ie

7th August 2022, 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Dear Parishioner,

‘An rud is annamh, is iontach’. Those six words in the

Irish language might be translated as: ‘That which seldom happens is

wonderful.’ I wonder can you think of situations where that applies!

People might say, when the sun appears after a long period of rain, that to

see it is wonderful. One might hear it referring to a team winning a

competition after failing to do so for 30 years. I have picked that phrase

because of an event taking place in our Cathedral in Killarney. At 3 p.m. on

Sunday afternoon, Mark Moriarty, a student from Killarney, who has

finished his studies in Maynooth College will be ordained a deacon. Maybe

the first time that we heard about deacons was when Francis White was

ordained a ‘Permanent Deacon’ a few years ago. Mark Moriarty’s

ordination as a deacon is the last step on the road to being a priest.

In my time in Maynooth (1965-1972), the ordination to diaconate took

place without any fanfare during the academic year. Some years, after I

was ordained, the diaconate ceremony was given a lift in importance,

when families of the candidates were invited to attend the ceremony in

Maynooth. I mentioned that Mark Moriarty has finished his studies for the

priesthood but ordination to priesthood will not take place until next year.

In the meantime, he will get experience as a deacon. This will not be his

first time to spend time in a parish. During the past few years, his fellow

seminarians and himslef have combined study in Maynooth with pastoral

involvement in a parish for part of the year. In my time, there was little or

no emphasis on getting practical experience – work placement that goes

with most kinds of training for a particular profession or career.

Earlier this week, I was reminded of an ordination to priesthood that I

attended in Thurles in 1975. On that occasion, Gerald Dwyer from Sneem

(I had been appointed there, after my ordination in 1972.), a member of

the Pallotine Order was ordained with other students from dioceses in

Munster. One of those was Maurice Brick (Fr. Mossie), whom I did not

know at that time. Fr. Gerald spent most of his priestly life in Rome, where

he died earlier this week. May he rest in heavenly peace. (Fr. Denis

O’Mahony)

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Every faith journey has its twists and turns
Fr. Brendan Hoban: Western People July 26, 2022
A reader suggests that I might answer a question that has obsessed
him/her for some time: how come that so many Catholics end up with
such a variety of religious experiences: God is distant/close, a stern
judge/a close friend, etc. The only rule he/she lays down for my thoughts
on this matter is that what I write should be simple, clear and to the point.
No complicated words, no theological jargon and no needless complication
or ambivalence.
Let’s see how I get on.
The first thing I’d say is that faith in God comes to us through our
development as human beings. So, let’s go back to basics. For most of us
we develop (as human beings) through three stages: infancy, adolescence
and adulthood – and usually in that order. For a religious sense to
develop, it has to take account of the specific needs of infancy,
adolescence and adulthood. Theologians use complicated words to
describe how religion must include three essential elements corresponding
to the three stages of life: in infancy, certainty; in adolescence,
questioning; and in adulthood, resolution. (To some degree, all three
elements are present at all three stages, as all three are necessary for the
development of a religious sense.)
In infancy, we tend to instruct because infants usually accept what their
parents (or teachers) tell them. We don’t expect questioning, though it
happens and we don’t ask a child to make up his or her own mind. It’s
beyond them at that stage. What infants want is security and protection
and, once those are available, they tend to comfortably accept the wisdom
handed to them. They prefer what’s black and white and are unhappy to
have to live in the grey. A crisis can develop if Daddy and Mammy are
not on the same hymn-sheet. The danger with the infancy stage – in terms
of religion – is that some settle into it so well that they don’t want to move
out of it later on. They prefer in later life to remain in an infantile state,
so religious growth is effectively impeded.
Some adult Catholics live in or pine for this stage of arrested religious
development. So, they want to be told what’s right or wrong; they like
simple catechism responses to complex questions; and, sometimes, those
in authority may encourage them in their infantile state by praising them
for their loyalty and obedience. The spiritual writer, Gerard Hughes, S.J.,

has written that there is ‘no more effective way of destroying true faith in
God than by misusing words like loyalty, obedience and faithfulness’.
Catholics, caught in a state of arrested infantile development, are often the
angriest in opposing any change in the Church and in resisting the present
reforms of Pope Francis.
With adolescence, we move into a time when the mind begins to
question and when a search for meaning begins to take centre stage.
Attempting to ward off a questioning spirit by not allowing adolescent
Catholics to think for themselves is self-defeating because, if the critical
element is not encouraged or worse still impeded, Catholics remain
infantile in their religious beliefs, which will be out of sync with how they
live. In adolescence, the critical consciousness needs to be
unambiguously fostered, resourced and cherished because, without it,
Catholics can remain infantile in their beliefs and practices which will not
reflect their lives and attitudes – with religion becoming a private matter,
confining God within set boundaries. On the one hand, this can be
difficult (and feel disloyal) when it runs against the accepted wisdom and
practice of parents who have provided security and protection of the infant
years. On the other hand, without a healthy critical environment, Catholics
can become obsessed with what they perceive as heresy in others.
Adults live in a world that’s complex and even mysterious and become
increasingly aware of the importance of ‘an inner world’ through which we
experience hope and despair, joy and sadness, fear and expectation,
certainty and doubt. The more adult we become, the more aware we are
that this inner world holds the key to personal happiness, especially when
we find that, as Christians, an important constituent of making our own
individual journey is the presence with us of a God, who loves us uniquely
and individually and beyond all our imaging. God is not a judge hovering
around us waiting for us to make mistakes but a God who is loving,
forgiving, merciful and compassionate. A God who loves us as we are –
despite our failures. A God with us, in good times and in bad, and on every
step of the pilgrimage of life. The great treasure that we seek as adult
Catholics is a personal, loving relationship with the God of Jesus Christ.
(Contd. at back)
What a church does for an adult Catholic is to provide encouragement and
guidance as we enter that most important stage of our religious journey, a
growing conviction that God is always and everywhere present to us.
Three elements correspond to three stages of human growth –
in infancy, certainty;
in adolescence, questioning; and
in adulthood, resolution.
All three elements are essential to religious growth and traces of all three
remain with us all our days. Every faith journey will have its own twists and
turns, moments of light and times of darkness, occasions when, to quote
the first letter to Corinthians, we see ‘in a mirror, dimly’ but other times
too, when we see ‘face to face’.
Points to Ponder Intercom July/August 2022
‘For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also’ (Lk 12:34). A
heart full of desire. We all have desires. The poor ones are those who have
no desire, no desire to go forward, toward the horizon; and for us
Christians this horizon is the encounter with Jesus, the very encounter with
him, who is our life, our joy, our happiness. I would like to ask you two
questions. First: do you all have a desiring heart? A heart that desires?
Think about it and respond silently in your hearts. I ask you is your heart
filled with desire, or is it a closed heart, a sleeping heart, a heart numb to
the things of life? The desire to go forward to encounter Jesus.
The second question: where is your treasure, what are you longing for?
Jesus told us: where your treasure is, there will be your heart – and I ask
you: where is your treasure? What is the most important reality for you,
the most precious reality, the one that attracts your heart like a magnet?
What attracts your heart? May I say that it is God’s love? God’s love that
gives meaning to our small daily tasks and helps us face the great trials.
This is the true treasure of humankind: going forward in life with love, with
that love which the Lord has sown in our hearts, with God’s love. This is
the true treasure. (Pope Francis, Angelus, St Peter’s Square, Rome)
Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time
to understand more so that we may fear less. (Marie Curie)
(Hellen Keller – Both quotations from Reality Magazine July/August 2022.

 

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WORDS TO THE WISE – “Small gestures of love, of tenderness, of care, make people feel that the Lord is with us. This is how the door of mercy opens.” – Pope Francis.

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People may regret the passing of their youth and yet if we listen to young people, they often have many preoccupations and concerns – fear of failure, lack of confidence, concern about the future and the thought – do I measure up to my friends in appearance and achievement?  I think the things older citizens may admire most are enthusiasm, curiosity and energy.   As we grow older, we manage to overcome most of our youthful fears but if we can go forward with optimism and a sense of wonder and joy, our age will always be unimportant.  We will keep within us the spirit of youth and that cannot be defeated by age !!

If you cannot be the pencil that writes someone’s happiness, then try to be the eraser that rubs out some of their sorrows

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Each day we move forward on life’s journey but with each step we take there

will inevitably be pitfalls.  Just think about it for a moment.  What might be an insurmountable problem to someone might be just the thing you can help with and vice versa..  In a very real sense we are all in the same boat travelling on

the same journey – so let’s pick up our oars and let’s all start rowing together.

 

LAST WORD: Nothing is ever lost by courtesy. It is the cheapest of pleasure, costs nothing and conveys much.                              

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A NOTE FROM FR. JIM....
During the week I heard someone say, ‘Have you noticed the days getting
shorter?’ As we begin autumn this week I’d like to reflect on Time.
Last Sunday’s psalm read: ‘Make us know the shortness of our life that we may
gain wisdom of heart’. I heard a woman say lately that when she goes through her
family photo albums she’s always reminded of one thing - how fast the years go
by. Firstly she sees pictures of her own childhood when she was a toddler holding
her mother's hand, then she sees pictures of her own children as toddlers holding
her hand. Then she sees her own children as young adults holding toddlers' hands.
She can’t believe how quickly her life has passed and being a woman of faith
realises how important it is to use the gift of time wisely.
Let us live our time in the context of eternity. Let us spend our time with what
really matters. With God in prayer, spend quality time with those we love, and
spend time with those in need of our love. Time Is......
Too slow for those who wait, Too swift for those who fear,
Too long for those who grieve, Too short for those who rejoice.
But for those who love, Time is eternity.
GOSPEL REFLECTION
But know this: if the owner of the house had known at what hour the thief was
coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. You also must be ready,
because the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour'
(vv.39-40).
Astonishingly, Jesus compares himself to a thief who unpredictably burgles a
house. In this and other ways, Jesus teaches that he will return, and that his
return will always be a surprise. Yet it mustn’t catch us unawares:
Be dressed ready for service and keep your lamps burning’ (v 35)

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Prayer

 

Following Christ's Lead

 

Jesus poses the same question from today’s Gospel to you: “Who do you say that I am?” Spend time today in prayer, asking the Lord to challenge your conception of him through his self-revelation.

 

God's Love for You

 

The Lord is faithful and has loved Israel, the Church, and you with an age-old love. Before you even existed, God loved you. Reflect on God’s incredible love for you, allowing it to shape your identity.

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The Love of True Prophets

 

In the First Reading, Hananiah deceives the Israelites, saying that they won't suffer. Jeremiah, however, loves his people too much to let them accept that lie. Thus, he shares the hard truth. The lesson is this: When we want to feel loved, we often lie; but when we love, we share the truth.

 

The Source of Happiness

 

An important theme shines through today's readings: greed versus God. The First Reading, the Psalm, and Paul's letter all urge us to focus on spiritual goods, not fleeting material goods. Jesus confirms this lesson in the Gospel. He reminds us that lasting happiness is ultimately found in relationship with God.

 

God Is Here

 

When the disciples saw Jesus walk on water, they became afraid. In response to their fear, the Lord says, "I AM." This brief line echoes the divine identity revealed to Moses. Thus, Jesus is saying that he is God, and that there is no reason to fear when we are in communion with him.

 

Finding Hope in Christ

 

In the First Reading, Jeremiah faces resistance when he preaches the truth. However, God supports the prophet; he gives him strength. Then, in the Gospel, Jesus reveals that he is the Resurrection and the Life. Thus, he is the source of our hope and courage. Let's remember this truth when we face hostility in our own lives.

 

Go with God

 

The story of Jeremiah foreshadows the life of Christ. Both proclaim the truth, and both are condemned by reigning authorities. As Christ's followers, we shouldn't be surprised if we face similar opposition. To remain steadfast and hopeful, let's stay rooted in prayer!

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Tito Edwards Tito Edwards manages Catholic websites for the new evangelization that Pope John Paul II and then Pope Benedict XVI asked for in the third millennium. After a lifetime of living a nominal Catholic life, he reverted completely to his childhood faith that began on the eve of the funeral of Pope John Paul II. He publishes Big Pulpit, Catholic Stand, Ignitum Today, and The American Catholic.

http://bigpulpit.com/

 

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Birdie O’Connor was Fr. Tim Galvin’s mother.  Fr. Tim Galvin is home on leave from South Sudan and was at the match on Sunday, he is a cousin of the Kerry Captain so with the help of the Limerick blood and Fr. Tim storming  Heaven, Galway stood no chance on Sunday - wasn’t that Sunday’s Gospel all about persistence!   Is this the first time that Kerry has the Sam Maguire and Limerick has the Liam McCarthy, definitely not since the forties or before and there’s no one around now to confirm or deny.  By the way, Fr. Tim has recently received an International award and a grant from Pope Francis’s Laudato Si’ Movement. ‘ He was honoured with an Individual Climate Action Award by Misean Cara an international and Irish Faith Based missionary movement for leading his parishioners in the growing of indigenous plants which help to improve food security.  He has also helped his community plant trees to prevent future flooding and has set up nurseries to cultivate indigenous trees.’  Laudato Si’ Movement ( Catholics for our Common Home). 

 

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CHAPLAINCY: Chaplains are professionals who provide spiritual, religious and emotional care to people in many different settings. As a chaplain, you will listen to people who are in a very vulnerable place. You’ll celebrate with families who have received great news. You’ll mark the beginning of lives, the end of lives and the many transforming moments in between. What training do I need? Board certification is required for employment as a chaplain. The Healthcare Chaplaincy Board (HCB) offers certification to Roman Catholics who: 1 Hold a degree in Theology (NFQ Level 8). 2 Complete H Dip or Masters in Pastoral Theology (Healthcare Chaplaincy) or 3 units of Clinical Pastoral Education. 3 Successfully meet the HCB Standards for Healthcare Chaplaincy.  Email: InformationHCBoard@gmail.com  The Bursary is provided by the Bon Secours Health System.

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Weekly Newsletter

8th Sunday after Pentecost

31st July 2022

 

Dear Friends of Sacred Heart Church, Limerick.

The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost speaks of our sonship of God. Jesus died for us that we might live in grace and have the fullness of life for eternity in us. If we live according to God’s Will, we have the Spirit of God in us and as such we are sons or children of God. Jesus told us to call God ‘Abba’, (Father). precisely because we are His sons. Anyone who does the Will of the Father is His son, and therefore heir. By His Mercy and Grace we are heirs to the Kingdom of God when we reject sin and live in His Divine Will.

We have had the pleasure of having Canon Le Picard with us for the past number of weeks. We benefited greatly from his quiet, holy presence as a newly ordained priest. Dear Canon, we thank you graciously for being with us for so long. As you leave us tomorrow, our prayers go with you and we ask God to bless you in all your ways.

We are glad to receive Canon Gribbin this Sunday. He will stay with us until the end of the week. Welcome back Canon. It is always a pleasure to have you here.

Next Friday is the First Friday of August. We will have the usual First Friday celebration of Holy Mass at 6pm, followed by Adoration, recitation of the rosary and Benediction.

 

The First Saturday devotions the following day will take place as Our Lady requested at 10am.

 

This First Saturday is also the Feast of the Transfiguration, a moment when Jesus was revealed as the Son of God to the three Apostles, Peter, James and John on Mount Tabor.

 

The voice of God the Father came from Heaven: ‘This is My beloved Son in Whom I am well pleased, listen to Him’ (2: Peter :1). This command to listen to Jesus comes directly from God the Father to us. We do well to obey it! It is closely connected to the readings of  today’s Mass, that is, to do the Will of God in order to live as His heirs and win Eternal Life.

As we prepare our hearts for the feast of the Assumption which is on Monday week, 15th August, we marvel at the spectacular event that took place: the Immaculate Virgin Mary was taken body and soul into heaven…. ‘A great sign appeared in heaven: A woman clothed with the sun, the moon beneath her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars’  (Apoc  :12:1).

We will have a procession in her honour following the 6 pm Mass. Please attend that Mass and procession to give witness to Her if you can.

Abbe Cisneros goes home tomorrow having spent most of the year with us. We hope you enjoy your time with your family. Have a well deserved rest and a safe trip dear Abbe and thank you for all you did for us.

Wishing you a blessed week,

Yours in Christ,

Canon Lebocq

Prior of Sacred Heart Church

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Just a Thought

This weekend – July 29th we celebrate the Feasts of St. Martha, Mary & Lazarus. The story of Martha and Mary is one of the better known Gospel stories. Martha and Mary were both good friends of Jesus. It was Martha who invited Jesus, but it is Mary who made him feel at home. It was Mary who understood that there is more to friendship than just doing things for someone else. Mary was in touch with the need of people to be accepted for who they are, to share their fears, and anxieties and their hopes and joys with someone else. All of us have that need. But not all of us meet that need. Mary did so particularly well. Trying to get the balance between Martha and Mary is the invitation. The rewards are great if we can try to get close.

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Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491 – 1556): Feast Day 31st July

This Sunday, 31st July 2022, we celebrate the Feast Day of Saint Ignatius of Loyola

(1491 – 1556). He was born into a Spanish noble family and in his youth was a

soldier and not too interested in religion. However in 1521 he was injured in a

battle at Pamplona and during his recovery he read the Bible and the Lives of

different Saints and this made him dedicate himself to the Lord. From 1528 on he

studied in Paris (France) and there with Saint Francis Xavier and five other

companions took vows of chastity and poverty in 1534 and founded the Society of

Jesus or the Jesuits, as they are commonly known, in 1537. Ignatius was the first

superior general of the order and moved to Rome in 1541 where he died on 31st July

1556. He was beatified on 27th July 1609 and canonised on 12th March 1622 along

with Saint Francis Xavier, Saint Teresa of Avila, Saint Isidore the Farmer and Saint

Philip Neri.

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Saint Alphonsus Liguori (1696 – 1787): Feast Day 1st August
On Monday, 1st August 2022, we celebrate the Feast Day of Saint Alphonsus Liguori
(1696 – 1787). He was Italian and practised as a lawyer before becoming a priest,
being ordained in 1726. He founded the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer
or the Redemptorists, as they are more commonly known, in 1732. The order was
dedicated to preaching God’s word through missions, retreats and other spiritual
ministries. He was the first superior of the order. He suffered greatly in the latter
part of his life before he died on 1st August 1787 at Nocera In Italy. He was beatified
on 15th September 1816 and canonised on 26th May 1839.

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Feast of St. John Vianney, better known as the Cure of Ars (in France) is

celebrated on Thursday 4th August. He is the patron saint of Priests.

Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord is celebrated on Saturday 6th August.

Jesus appears in his glory to Peter, James and John

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At the end of life what really matters is not what we bought but what we built’ not what we got but what we shared; not competence but our character; and not our success but our significance.  Live a life that matters.  Live a life of Love.

 

A lot of our problems arise from one question – What will people think?   If we disregard that question a lot of the problems will disappear too !!

 

Wherever you turn, you can find someone who needs you.  Even if it is little thing – do something for which there is no pay but the privilege of doing it.  Remember – you don’t live in a world all on your own.

 

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Dear Holy Spirit – I pray for healing and comfort for anyone dealing with sadness, pain, illness, or going through a difficult time right now.  I pray that they find refuge in you in the midst of their pain and suffering.  May you continue to give them the strength to keep going.  To push through these dark moments and know you are with them every step of the way.   Amen    (Ehimen Okaka).

 

Few things in the world are more powerful than a positive push – a smile, a word of optimism and hope or a simple “you can do it” when things are tough.

 

SUCCESS IS A LADDER YOU CANNOT CLIMB WITH YOUR HANDS IN YOUR POCKETS

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EFLECTION ON THE GOSPEL - Luke 12:13-21
Who appointed me as your judge? (Luke 12:14)
Who wouldn’t want to have Jesus on their side in a property dispute? Think of it:
the Son of God himself advocating for you to receive as much as possible. Your
opponent wouldn’t stand a chance!
But then again, judging by today’s Gospel, Jesus may be the exact person
you
don’t want to consult. At least not if you’re trying to maximize your takeaway.
Remember, this is the One who said, “Blessed are you who are poor,” and who told
a wealthy man to sell all his possessions and give the money to the needy (Luke
6:20; 18:18-23). You might prefer that he stay out of the whole thing. It’s just as
well anyway, since Jesus didn’t seem too interested in engaging in the argument
between these two brothers!
Jesus may have seemed disinterested in this man’s complaint, but that doesn’t
mean he didn’t care about this fellow. Jesus loved him and his brother just as
deeply as he loved Peter or John or anyone else. What he cared about was
whether this man would show that same love to his own brother. He cared about
whether he would learn to be detached from his possessions so that he could
discover the even greater treasure of sharing in his love. That’s why he warned
the man against greed; he could see that it was motivating him far more than love
was.
Jesus ended his parable by urging his hearers to become “rich in what matters to
God” (Luke 12:21). And what matters to God is not how much or how little we
possess, but how much or how little we are possessed by our possessions. What
matters to God is the degree to which we are free to dedicate our money, our
time, and our abilities to loving and caring for one another.
Jesus isn’t against wealth or possessions. He just values them less than he values
our love—and our ability to love one another. That’s what truly matters to him.
“Jesus, help me to become rich in what matters to you.”

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The Soul's Longing

 

Today, on the Feast of Mary Magdalene, the Church gives us a section from the Song of Songs. This beautiful passage echoes the Shema, which reminds us to focus on loving the Lord. Isn't it incredible that the Creator of the cosmos desires intimacy with us?

 

Among the early followers of Jesus, Mary Magdalene was the first to see the resurrected Jesus. Overwhelmed by this encounter, she went and shared the Good News with the disciples. As we celebrate her feast day, enter into this biblical scene with Easter in Art: Mary Magdalene and Via Lucis - Station 3: The Risen Lord Appears to Mary Magdalene.

 

A Fruitful Soul

 

Jesus foretold that his Church would be filled with wheat and weeds, saints and sinners. They will be separated from one another when Christ comes again in power and glory. In the meantime, let's focus on pulling the weeds taking root in our own souls. Diligently performing this simple task helps reform the Church!

 

Patterned after Christ

 

Jesus flips the world's understanding of power on its head. He shows us that in the Kingdom of God, authority is granted for the sake of service to others. In other words, the true leaders are those who following Christ's example of selfless love.

 

Is There a Hell?

 

Today's readings return to the image of the wheat and the weeds. Jesus explains that in the last day, the weeds—those who dwell in sin—will feel the fire of justice. The wheat, on the other, hand will shine like the sun. With this image in mind, let's strive to be wheat, the righteous disciples of Christ.

 

 

Divine Craftsmanship

 

God teaches Jeremiah a valuable lesson in the First Reading. He reveals that he is the potter of our lives. Using events and people as his wheel, he shapes our souls; he makes them sturdy and healthy. Though this process can look confusing from our side of things, let's trust the divine craftsman.

 

The Treasure Ahead

 

Through his parables, Jesus explains that the Kingdom of God is invaluable. All the world's wealth added together would be nothing compared to the glory that awaits the faithful. So, let's refocus our lives on the Kingdom. Let's think about how we can prioritize God.

 

 

 

===================================

Prayer for Grandparents

(Composed by Pope Benedict XVI)

Lord Jesus, You were born of the Virgin Mary, the daughter of Saints Joachim and

Anne. Look with love on grandparents the world over. Protect them! They are a

source of enrichment for families, for the Church and for all of society.

Support them! As they grow older, may they continue to be for their families strong

pillars of Gospel faith, guardians of noble domestic ideals, living treasures of sound

religious traditions. Make them teachers of wisdom and courage, that they may

pass on to future generations the fruits of their mature human and spiritual

experience.

Lord Jesus, help families and society to value the presence and role of grandparents.

May they never be ignored or excluded, but always encounter respect and love.

Help them to live serenely and to feel welcomed in all the years of life which You give

them.

Mary, Mother of all the living, keep grandparents constantly in your care,

accompany them on their earthly pilgrimage, and by your prayers, grant that all

families may one day be reunited in our heavenly homeland, where you await all

humanity for the great embrace of life without end. Amen!

 

-----------------

Pope’s Sunday Angelus: ‘Listen to Jesus — Everything Else Comes After’...

 

Addressing the faithful gathered in St Peter's Square for the Sunday Angelus, Pope Francis described the day's liturgy, which presents us with the story of Martha and Mary, two sisters offering hospitality to Jesus in their home. The Pope recounts that Martha welcomes the guests whilst Mary sits at Jesus' feet to listen to him until Martha turns to him and asks him to tell Mary to help her.

-----------------------

Before I go to sleep, I remember before you all the people I love and now in silence I say their names to you  I remember before you al the people who are sad and lonely, old and forgotten, poor and hungry and cold, in pain of body

and in distress of mind.  Bless all who specially need your blessing and bless me too and make this a good night for me.  This I ask for your love’s sake.  Amen

 

Life goes by so quickly.  One day we can feel great and the next broken.  The pandemic teaches us to appreciate the little things.  Nothing is permanent.  So be thankful for your blessings.  Life is so very precious.

 

RECIPE:A series of instructions for preparing ingredients you forgot to buy,  in utensils you don’t have to make a dish that the dog won’t eat !!!!!!!

 

LAST WORD: If one does no good, gives no happiness, reaches out to no-one, what is the point of living at all?

 

 

 

 

 

The Humble King

 

Jesus Christ, the Son of the living God, doesn't present himself in all his divine power—we could never bear such a sight. Instead, he approaches with gentleness, reaching out to strengthen and encourage us. Indeed, he wants us to find hope and rest in him.

 

Sit at His Feet

 

In today's Gospel, Jesus gently rebukes Martha. Though motivated by a good desire, Martha prioritized secondary tasks over her Lord. Drawing from this scene, St. Thérèse reminds us that meditating on Christ and his actions are the one thing necessary for our souls.

 

We Need Living Water

 

In Israel's early days, the nation was faithful to God's commandments. In Jeremiah's time, however, the Chosen People sought happiness without God. Thus, they became like broken cisterns—their satisfaction was always fleeting. Learning from Israel's mistake, let's always seek God, the living water, above all else.

 

Docile to the Word

 

The image of sowing seeds invites us consider whether the word of God is taking root in us or not. Are we following what we heard in Mass or prayer? Do we trust that the Lord will give us the grace to accomplish what he calls us to? Today, let's resolve to be fertile soil for God.

 

Micah's Reminder

 

In the First Reading, Micah draws on his own name—he ponders who is like God. In his reflection, the prophet hones in on an essential characteristic of the Lord: mercy. Unlike other so-called gods, the God of Israel forgives us, casting our sins into the depths of the sea.

 

Micah's Reminder

 

Today, the prophet Micah gives us a beautiful reminder of our calling: We must embody the love God shows us—his hesed—and we must walk humbly alongside him. In other words, we must love our neighbors, and we must love God.

 

BE INFORMED: Please go to the Catholic Website – formed.org/signup. Pick of the week –

 

“Many people, when in  bed, find worries chasing round their head,

Much more use, it must be said, to count the day’s blessings instead.”

There is a lot of truth in these words.  It is very easy to dwell on the day’s troubles and concern for the future.  But it is a rare day that does not contain some blessings.  So next time your thoughts keep you awake, think of some high-point during the day – perhaps you met an old friend; congratulate yourself on a nice meal you made; maybe you took a small step towards achieving a distant goal; noticed flowers blossoming in the garden; went for a walk on the beach.  This is the stuff of everyday life, but it is worth more than we realize – and we can make it all the more meaningful by choosing to dwell on the positive.

 

Surely one of the saddest things in life is to regret the lost opportunities for friendship and kindness once a friend or close relative has died.  So, if there is a small kindness you could do -  write that promised letter or perhaps even a quick word on the phone just to say hello, then why not do it today?   OR EVEN BETTER – WHY NOT DO IT NOW!!!

 

EACH DAY YOU ARE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE GRATEFUL

-------------------------------------------

DAY FOR GRANDPARENTS & THE ELDERLY: This Sunday
24th July 2022 is the ‘World Day for Grandparents and the Elderly’
established by Pope Francis with the theme this year being ‘I am with
you always’ (Mt 28:20) Mary’s Magnificat wells up in Mary’s heart at the
moment when she meets her elderly cousin Elizabeth. But what about
you? Do you realize how extraordinarily enriching the encounter
between the young and the elderly can be? How much attention do you
pay to the elderly, to your grandparents? With good reason you want to
“soar”, your heart is full of great dreams, but you need the wisdom and
the vision of the elderly. Spread your wings and fly, but also realize that
you need to rediscover your roots and to take up the torch from those
who have gone before. To build a meaningful future, you need to know
and appreciate the past. As Mary did with Elizabeth, look to the elderly,
to your grandparents.– (Pope Francis, 2017)
Let us this week pray for all grandparents, past and present and thank
the Lord for their witness and the spreading of the Gospel.
————————————————————————————————
PRAYER FOR THE WORLD DAY FOR GRANDPARENTS AND THE
ELDERLY
I thank You, Lord, for the comfort of Your presence:
even in times of loneliness, You are my hope and my confidence, You
have been my rock and my fortress since my youth! I thank You for
having given me a family and for having blessed me with a long life. I
thank You for moments of joy and difficulty, for the dreams that have
already come true in my life and for those that are still ahead of me. I
thank You for this time of renewed fruitfulness to which You call me.
Increase, O Lord, my faith, make me a channel of your peace, teach me
to embrace those who suffer more than me, to never stop dreaming and
to tell of your wonders to new generations. Protect and guide Pope
Francis and the Church, that the light of the Gospel might reach the
ends of the earth. Send Your Spirit, O Lord, to renew the world, that the
storm of the pandemic might be calmed, the poor consoled and wars
ended. Sustain me in weakness and help me to live life to the full in
each moment that You give me, in the certainty that you are with me
every day, even until the end of the age. Amen.

 

 

 

————————————————————————————————

PRAYER FOR THE WORLD DAY FOR GRANDPARENTS AND THE ELDERLY

I thank You, Lord, for the comfort of Your presence:

even in times of loneliness, You are my hope and my confidence, You

have been my rock and my fortress since my youth! I thank You for

having given me a family and for having blessed me with a long life. I

thank You for moments of joy and difficulty, for the dreams that have

already come true in my life and for those that are still ahead of me. I

thank You for this time of renewed fruitfulness to which You call me.

Increase, O Lord, my faith, make me a channel of your peace, teach me

to embrace those who suffer more than me, to never stop dreaming and

to tell of your wonders to new generations. Protect and guide Pope

Francis and the Church, that the light of the Gospel might reach the

ends of the earth. Send Your Spirit, O Lord, to renew the world, that the

storm of the pandemic might be calmed, the poor consoled and wars

ended. Sustain me in weakness and help me to live life to the full in

each moment that You give me, in the certainty that you are with me

every day, even until the end of the age. Amen.

---------------------------------

NOTE FROM FR. JIM....
Dear Parishioners of Glenflesk,
Firstly I’d like to introduce myself. My name is Fr. Jim Lenihan a native of
Boherbue Co. Cork. I’ve spent the last 8 years serving the people of Killarney and
previously I ministered in in Beara and Listowel.
Secondly I’d like to thank you for your warm welcome. I look forward to getting to
know you and journeying with you into the future. It’s a wonderful privilege to be
your Priest. There is great evidence of Christ’s presence in your community in the
way you worship God and support and build up each other. I’d also like to take this
opportunity to remember Fr. Kevin who was taken from us in such heartbreaking
and unexpected way. May he rest in peace and receive the rewards for his labours.
A special word of gratitude too to Fr. Tagdh, Fr. Dan and Fr. Nicholas. I’d like
thank them and all the parish staff for making themselves available in such a
generous way to keep the parish active and vibrant for the past 7 months. A
special word of thank too to Fr. Padraig Kennelly and Jackie McElligott for running
the parish administration so well over those months.
May the Lord bless us all as we journey forward and may we work together to
continue building Gods Kingdom in our parish and as scripture says ‘May they know
that we are Christians by the way we love’.
Fr. Jim.

--------------------------------

Killarney Parish July 2022

WELCOME TO OUR NEW PRIESTS: Fr Joe Begley and Fr Sean Jones

are joining Fr Kieran as our parish team into the future.

Fr Joe Begley is well familiar to us from his time as a teacher in St

Brendan’s College, and afterwards as parish priest in Kilcummin parish.

He has also ministered in Dingle and Glengarriff.

Fr Sean Jones was with us in the parish in his year as a deacon before

his ordination in 2018. He joins us from St John’s parish Tralee, and he

being the youngest priest of the diocese reminds us to pray for vocations

to the priesthood and religious life.

We are delighted to have them with us, we pray God’s blessing on them

in their ministry, and we assure them of our every support.

FOR THE PEOPLE OF UKRAINE
Loving God, We pray for the people of Ukraine, For all those suffering or afraid,
that you will be close to them and protect them.
We pray for world leaders, for compassion, strength and wisdom to guide their choices.
We pray for the world; that in this moment of crisis, we may reach out in solidarity to our
brothers and sisters in need. May we walk in your ways so that peace and justice become a reality for the people of Ukraine and for all the world. Amen.
Our Lady, Queen of Peace, pray for us! Our Lady of Kyiv, pray for us!

------------------------------

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====================

================================

Seeing Your Life Through The Lens of The Gospel

- Questions for personal reflection

John Byrne OSA

Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

17 July 2022

The two sisters symbolize the contemplative and active dimensions of life, at

times difficult to balance. What wisdom have you learned through life

experiences on how to strike a balance between prayer and action?

Many people misunderstand hospitality. They worry and fret about decorating

the house and preparing abundant food. Yet sometimes it is something else

that is needed to make people feel at home, namely, to sit with guests and to

listen to them speaking. What has been your experience of being a cherished

guest and when have you been able to make others feel welcome and at home?

We can make the same mistake in relation to people who are important to us in

life: children, friends, parents, or others. We can worry and fret about doing

things for them when perhaps the important thing is to give them time and to

listen to them. What does your experience tell you?

When it comes to welcoming God into our lives, one appropriate response is to

give time listening to God’s word. When have you found time devoted to the

word of God enriching for you?

========================================

 

 

World Day for Grandparents and the Elderly 2022

Pope Francis has established a World Day for Grandparents and the Elderly, which

will take place for the second time on Sunday 24 July 2022 on the theme

‘In old age they will still bear fruit (Ps 92:15)’. The World Day was established to

be celebrated on the Sunday closest to the Feast Day of Saints Joachim and Anne

on 26 July.

Bishop Denis Nulty, chair of the Bishops’ Council for Marriage and the Family

has welcomed Pope Francis’ Message for the World Day for Grandparents and the

Elderly 2022 on the theme ‘In old age they still bring forth fruit’ (Ps 92:14).

Bishop Nulty said, “In his message, Pope Francis says that old age is no time to

give up and lower the sails, but a season of enduring fruitfulness: a new mission

awaits us and bids us look to the future. I am very encouraged by Pope Francis’

words as I look around our Church and see the long and faithful service offered by

our elderly priests and religious and the decades long commitment of so many lay

faithful to our parishes.

“The World Day for Grandparents and the Elderly is taking place this year against

the backdrop of the war in Ukraine and conflict in many other parts of the

world. Pope Francis addresses this in his text and invites Grandparents in particu-

lar ‘to teach the women and men of our time to regard others with the same

understanding and loving gaze with which we regard our own grandchildren.

Our grandparents held us in their arms and carried us on their knees; now is the

time for us to carry on our own knees – with practical assistance or with prayer

alone – not only our own grandchildren but also the many frightened

grandchildren whom we have not yet met and who may be fleeing from war or

suffering its effects”.

 

PEACE.....A CHINESE PROVERB

If there be righteousness in the heart, there will be beauty in the character.

If there is beauty in the character, there will be harmony in the home.

If there is harmony in the home, there will be order in the nation.

When there is order in the nation, there will be peace in the world.

THANK GOD

Thank God for dirty dishes - they have a tale to tell;

While other folk go hungry, they show we're eating well.

So even when the sink's piled high, please do not make a fuss;

For by this stack of evidence, God is truly good to us.

 

 

Prayer to Saint Joseph which Pope Francis has said for more than 40 years:

Glorious Patriarch Saint Joseph, whose power makes the impossible possible, come

to my aid in these times of anguish and difficulty. Take under your protection the

serious and troubling situations that I commend to you, that they may have a happy

outcome. My beloved father, all my trust is in you. Let it not be said that I invoked

you in vain, and since you can do everything with Jesus and Mary, show me that

your goodness is as great as your power. Amen

 

 

The Surrender Novena is now available on Amen

July 2022; Join us on a nine-day journey to find deeper faith and rest in your life. The Surrender Novena provides a brief prayer to guide your response to God's invitation to give him every worry, desire, hope, fear, and suffering.

PRAY WITH US

"O Jesus, I surrender myself to you, take care of everything!" The words Christ gave to Servant of God Don Dolindo Ruotolo offer comfort and solace to Catholics worldwide. The Surrender Novena extends the peace of Christ amid confusion and chaos as each day encourages a greater "letting go" to the Lord. Amen invites you to entrust your concerns to the Lord with complete confidence in his goodness.

He Hears, He Sees

In Isaiah 38, God tells Hezekiah that he has heard his prayers and seen his tears. In other words, God knows and loves Hezekiah, just as he knows and loves you. In response, let's pray in thanksgiving. Let's praise the Lord for his attention and gifts, especially the gift of life.

 

Modern Idolatry

 

When we look closely at today's world, it becomes clear that many people place their trust in money or political regimes. The Scriptures, however, urge us to place our trust in God, not the world. Indeed, faithfully following our Lord is the only way we find true freedom and security.

 

Ordinary Men, Extraordinary Graces

 

In today's Gospel, Jesus grants the Twelve the ability to perform mighty deeds in his name. This authority continues to be passed down to bishops and priests today. They have been given the power to bring Christ to us, especially through the sacraments.

 

Unending Love and Mercy

 

At the heart of the Book of Hosea is God's desire to gather the northern tribes back to himself. He wants Ephraim to recognize that he is the true, loving Father. Thousands of years later, God still expresses the same paternal tenderness. He calls all those who have fallen away back into intimate communion with him.

 

The Pattern of Victory

 

Today's Gospel presents us with a sobering message: Christ sends us out like sheep in the midst of wolves. In other words, he calls us to minister to a hostile world that needs the Good News. To accomplish this mission, we must conform ourselves to the crucified yet victorious Lord.

Following the Path

 

When it comes to the life of discipleship, Jesus tells us that love of God must come first. Everything else—including our careers, friends, and even families—must come second. Though this command may sound harsh, it is the path to perfect charity, and it enables us to love friends and family better.

 

The Steadiness of the Faithful

 

The First Reading reminds us of a fundamental message: Your trust is the measure of your faith. Moreover, the more we trust, the more firmly established we'll be. In other words, faith allows us to remain calm and steady despite the chaos of the world. It's trust or bust.

 

by Tracey Edstein

 

Sr. Melissa Dwyer, an educator who led a girls' school in Malawi, is now leader of the Canossian Daughters of Charity in Australia. In a past life, she dreamed of an Olympic gold medal. But, as she says, "God has ways."

 

Humbled and Reminded

 

Betrayal looms in the background of the First Reading. Instead of trusting God, Israel sought an alliance with Assyria, a powerful, pagan nation. As a result, Israel suffered persecution. Interestingly enough, the same happens in the Church. Whenever Christians cooperate with evil, consequences arise—God alone is our salvation!

 

Light and Full of Love

 

Serving Solomon or Rehoboam, kings from Israel's past, meant bearing heavy burdens. Christ, however, came as a different kind of king—he showed himself to be a servant-king. Following him means taking up the yoke of love, which becomes lighter with every step.

 

Do something today to bring gladness to someone whose pleasures are few.

Do something to drive off sadness – or cause someone’s dreams to come true.

Find time for a neighbourly greeting and time to delight an old friend.

Remember the years are fleeting and life’s greatest day will soon end.

Do something today that tomorrow will prove to be really worthwhile.

Help someone to conquer sorrow and greet the new dawn with a smile.

 

Appreciative words are the most powerful force for good on this earth. 

A simple “thank you” can strengthen existing friendships and build new ones, but quite simply, it makes people feel appreciated and that is something we all need once in a while.

 

We all have dreams and hopes for the future but without the foundation of hard work and the cornerstone of commitment, those will amount to nothing.  Remember if you build castles in the air, your work need not be lost – that is where they should be.  Now put the foundations under them.

 

LAST WORD: Take time to be thankful for everything that you already have.  You can always have more, but remember you could also have a lot less

 

=======================================

Clerical Appointments Summer 2022

Summer is here again and thank God we are quite hopeful that Covid will be under good control.  It has been a difficult and challenging year for us all.  Ever there for one another, together we have come through.  Sincere thanks to all clergy and so many in all our parish communities, for their dedicated service throughout the year. A special word of thanks to parish secretaries.

 

A Christian Sunday

 

It is good to see many have returned to regular weekend church attendance. As a Christian how do you mark Sunday, the Lord’s Day?   I encourage every home to think about it and make a definite decision. Henceforth, what part will “having time for God and for prayer” play in your Sunday?  Do you intend to gather regularly with your fellow parishioners on Sunday mornings to offer together Christ’s sacrifice, to offer Holy Mass?

 

If young children do not grow up with a familiarity with prayer in the home and regular Sunday Mass, will they grow up to have faith in Jesus Christ and God present among us? It is important that we all keep regular contact with God. In these difficult times, God is a source of security and comfort.

 

Thank you

Thank you to all who already serve in our parishes, priests, deacons and laity. Thanks to our religious-education teachers in Primary and Secondary schools. Thanks to our chaplains in schools, hospitals and in MTU, Tralee. It is good news that Fr Amos and Fr Vitalis, our two priests on loan from Kitale diocese in Kenya, will be with us for a further three years. Their joy in their faith is an inspiration to us all. Continue to pray for vocations and for our two seminarians that they will in time be priests among us.

 

This Summer appointments

 

This Summer’s appointments are few.  Still, they effect four Pastoral Areas, and it will take time for each to adjust.  Sincere thanks to Fr Tom Leane P.P. Dromtariffe, who has reached the retirement age, having given wonderful loving service for more than fifty years.  In the Duhallow/Sliabh Luachra Pastoral Area, Dromtariffe parish will now be served by the priests of the Pastoral Area.  We have had a large number of priests celebrating Jubilees this year including two silver, two golden and two diamond.  Thank God for their lives of priestly service.

 

Lay Ministry

 

Each year retirements means fewer priests in our parishes. Sadly, this is something that will continue. It is vital that our recently launched new initiative “Ministry of lay Pastoral Leader” be successful.  In the leaflet introducing this Ministry I wrote: “In an era when priests and religious were more plentiful, so much was left in their care. Today they are fewer in number.  Sustaining the fullness of life in the parish family requires the participation, commitment, and leadership of the laity.  Hence, I warmly welcome the “Ministry of Lay Pastoral Leadership” that we embark upon.”  As Pope Benedict said in 2009, “The laity must no longer be viewed as “collaborators” of the clergy but truly recognised as “co-responsible” for the Church’s being and action …”

 

The Synodal Pathway Worldwide and in Ireland

 

Thank you to the three-member diocesan Synodal Pathway team, and to all who participated in the listening gatherings held throughout the diocese before Easter. This is part of the worldwide preparation Pope Francis requested as preparation for the Synod in Rome in October 2023.  It is just the beginning; Pope Francis wants that “hearing all voices” become a permanent part of Church life everywhere.  In a recent National Synodal Pathway gathering in Athlone, the welcome address gave the following explanation of what is involved:

 

“We are going to be journeying together for a significant amount of time.  In fact, we are going to be journeying together and learning to journey together perpetually.  If we are to learn to listen so that we might truly understand each other, if we are to learn how to rely on the Holy Spirit more than on ourselves, and if we are to learn how to dialogue with others, ‘Synodality’ is the path expected of us in the third millennium.”

 

 I encourage everyone to read on the diocesan website the ten-page synopsis of our discussions throughout the diocese.  It summarises the issues people considered in need of deep reflection.

 

In God we trust

 

At that gathering in Athlone, a piece of scripture from the prophet Isaiah was proposed to us:                                                                                                      Thus says the Lord,

 

I am about to do a new thing;

 

now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?

 

I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.      Is 43:19-21

 

In the diocese of Kerry, we are called to be open to the guidance of the Holy Spirit, trusting in God to lead us along the right path.

 

Bishop Ray Browne 1st July 2022

 

 

 

 

=============================================

 

The Presbytery, Abbeydorney. (066 7135146; 087 6807197)

abbeydorney@dioceseofkerry.ie

3rd July, 2022. 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Dear Parishioner,

During this past week, you may have wondered if I was on

‘Cloud 9’, following the celebration of my Golden Jubilee of ordination to

the priesthood last weekend! I can say that I didn’t have that feeling but I

was relieved that everything had gone well and I was, naturally, very

grateful to all who had made it possible. Background preparation had gone

on for some time and many people were involved in making the occasion

possible. It is often said that, while it may be a bit difficult to get

involvement of people in a parish that means they have to perform in front

of their own neighbours and friends, there is never a problem in getting

people to do things in a quieter way. That might be decorating a hall,

bringing cakes, scones and other nice things. The baking side of things will

normally be done by women and the men have their jobs as well. I wish to

express a sincere word of thanks to all who were involved in making ‘my

50th’ (not my birthday) a special occasion. I will give a word of

acknowledgement next week for contributions to the ‘Jubilee Fund’ and

for gifts given to myself.

I have put in a little piece from Reality Magazine about the new leader of

the Kiltegan Fathers (St. Patricks Missionary Society), a very historic

happening. I recall during my time in Kenya in the years 1981-1987,

attending meetings where the desirability of making St. Patrick’s

Missionary Society one, which would invite young men to join the Society,

from the countries where Irish missionaries had been working since the

foundation of the Society in 1932. These were mainly African countries

and Brazil in South America. While the Kerry Diocesan priests in Kenya

played no part in deciding whether this major step should be taken, we

were invited to attend meetings, where the question was being discussed.

The task of deciding how the Society should be moving as the end of the

20th century approached was an important one because it was becoming

clear that vocations to the priesthood in Ireland – both the diocesan and

missionary vocation – were decreasing with each year that passed. Making

a decision to take in African students would involve a lot of adjustments

and would need continuous sources of income. After a lot of discussion,

prayer and discernment, the decision was made to go international. Lots

of good things have happened since then. May all concerned be blessed.

(Fr. Denis O’Mahony)

-------------------------------------

Let’s Put Traveller Rights First

The Exclusion Of Travellers From Irish Society Has Gone On For Too Long

If Travellers were black, Ireland would be universally condemned as a

racist, apartheid country. Housing and employment exclusion are the most

visible signs of apartheid. Travellers often face opposition from the settled

community at any attempt to provide them with housing or ‘Traveller-

specific’ accommodation. Over 500 Traveller households are currently on

unauthorised sites, which have no basic facilities, many on the side of busy

roads, and are vulnerable to eviction. A welcome development was the

recent Supreme Court ruling to overturn a decision to evict a family from

public land where they had been living for five years, citing article 40.5 of

the Constitution on the “inviolability” of a dwelling and article 8 of the

European Convention on Human Rights. Other Travellers live in

overcrowded halting sites in bad conditions. The Ombudsman for Children

published a damning report on the conditions on a halting site in Cork,

describing it as filthy, overcrowded, rat-infested, and unsafe, with poor

sanitation and waste management, and in violation of the rights of

Traveller children. He has referred his report to the UN Committee on the

Rights of the Child. Other Traveller sites, because they are designated as

‘temporary’, are not properly maintained and are in an equally bad

condition. Over 500 individual Travellers are homeless, 11 times the rate

for the general population. Governments have come to rely on the private

rented sector to provide accommodation for homeless or low-income

households, but Travellers seeking accommodation in the private rented

sector are 22 times more likely to be discriminated against by landlords.

Travellers also face discrimination in relation to employment; 85 per cent

of Travellers are unemployed. Many blame Travellers themselves for being

unemployed, rather than the underlying racism which is largely

responsible. While many Travellers give up seeking employment, the

reason is that constant rejection is demoralising and undermines a person’s

self-worth. The walls Travellers have to climb to get a job are often

insurmountable.

The needs of Traveller children are failed by the educational system. Some

55 per cent leave school with no qualification, compared with 13 per cent

in the general population. Just 1 per cent have a third-level degree,

compared

to over 25 per cent in the general population. Many Traveller children do

not feel included, wanted or safe in school, and sometimes their parents,

who may have had dreadful experiences themselves in school, worry about

them while in school. In a recent book (Unseen Homelessness in the

Traveller Community – Pavee Point), one author describes very movingly

the experience of a young child, oblivious to the fact that he is a Traveller,

slowly coming to the realisation that he is being treated differently from

other children and feeling unwanted. He comes to realise that other

children have been told by their mothers not to play with him, and to

wonder why he has to live on the edge of a motorway with no running

water or toilets. The life expectancy for Traveller men is 15 years less than

for the general population and over 12 years less for women. The suicide

rate is seven times higher than for the general population. Their

experience of exclusion is certainly a major cause. We can inflict violence

on others by our inaction, as much as by our actions. The failure of Irish

society to address the exclusion faced by Travellers is a societal violence

perpetrated against them. Their exclusion is a stain on the soul of this

country.

For Travellers to participate in society equally with others, many of us need

a change of mind and heart. Changing minds and hearts is what religion is

about. The Churches have a major role here. I would love to see every

bishop put Traveller rights at the top of their social justice agenda, and

make a commitment that they will do everything to ensure that in 12

months’ time, there would be no Travellers living on the side of the road or

in “temporary” halting sites. That means actively lobbying their local

authorities, and challenging those who want to keep Travellers apart, and

accepting the opprobrium and abuse which will come their way but that is

surely the Christian way. For Christians, the equal dignity of every human

being is a fundamental core belief and reaching out to the ‘other’ is a basic

commandment. (Fr. Peter McVerry Reality July/August 2022)

Kiltegan Fathers Elect First African Leader: St. Patrick’s Missionary Society,

widely known as the Kiltegan Fathers, has elected an African leader for the

first time in the society’s 90 year history. Fr. Richard Filima, was

announced as the new leader, to succeed Fr. Victor Dunne. The 43-year-

old is from Bodo, River State in Nigeria. He joined St. Patrick’s Missionary

Society in 1997 and was ordained a priest on 26th January 2008. (Reality

Magazine, July/August 2022) This piece is only part of the account of the

election of the new leader. I wanted to mention that Fr. Seán Cremin, from

Knocknagree, Co. Cork is the deputy leader. He was ordained in 1997,

when I was leaving Knocknagree to return to Kenya. (D. O’M.)

Seeing your Life through the Lens of the Gospel John Byrne OSA

1. Jesus sent out his disciples on a mission to let people know ‘The

kingdom of God has come near to you.’ Recall when you have reached out

to another in word or in deed to help them realize that they were

cherished, perhaps by a word of sympathy or encouragement, or by giving

a hand with a difficult task. What was it like for you to experience yourself

as a person bringing help and encouragement to another?

2. Recent events (Covid pandemic, the war in Ukraine, and poverty and

famine in some countries) have created situations of dire need for some.

These crises have also brought out great generosity as people reached out

in caring for the sick and refugees and contributing money when they

could. Perhaps there are individuals or groups that have particularly.

inspired you. Remember them and ask God’s blessing on them.

3. Jesus sent the disciples out two by two. When have you found it

beneficial not to be working alone, but with another by your side? How did

companionship change the experience? What you were able to achieve

together that you could not have done on your own?

4. When the disciples returned Jesus warned them not to focus on the

thrill of what they had been able to achieve. It was more important that

their ‘names are written in heaven’. Sometimes we also need reminders

that who we are is more important than what we do. Who have been the

people who brought this home to you? Have there been experiences that

helped you to appreciate this?

Reflections from Reality Magazine, July/August 2022.

I ‘d say to someone, who is standing there in a room and they feel like

there are no windows, no doors and it’s all black.............to take their time

and a door will open. Someone will be at that door. (Donal Walsh)

Rest is not idleness and to lie sometimes on the grass under trees on a

summer’s day, listening to the murmur of the water, or watching the

clouds float across the sky, is by no means a waste of time. (John

Lubbock)

I have no idea who John Lubbock was but I am happy to have known Donal

Walsh from Tralee, the young student who made a wonderful impression

on those who heard him speaking, before he died from cancer. (D. O’M)

-----------------------===================================

Benedict (480 – 547) – Feast Day: 11th July

Saint Benedict is one of the six Patron Saints of Europe. The others are the two

brothers from Thessalonika in Greece, Cyril (825 – 869) and Methodius (826 – 885),

Bridget of Sweden (1303 – 1373), Catherine of Siena in Italy (1347 – 1380) and the

German Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross or Edith Stein (1891 – 1942). The Feast

Day of Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius is 14th February, that of Saint Bridget of

Sweden 23rd July, that of Saint Catherine of Siena 29th April and that of Saint Teresa

Benedicta of the Cross 9th August.

Saint Benedict (480 – 547) and his twin sister Saint Scholastica (480 – 543) are

believed to have been born into a wealthy family in Norcia in the region of Umbria in

Italy around the year 480. He received a very good education in Rome. However

the low morals of the people in Rome at that time disgusted him and so he left the

eternal city to settle in Enfide about 40 miles away. Then around 500 he went to the

nearby wild and remote area of Subiaco and lived there as a hermit in a cave for the

next three years. His life of prayer and solitude attracted people to him and over the

next 20 years about 12 monasteries of monks opened in that area.

In the year 530 having left the Subiaco area Benedict founded the great monastery

of Monte Cassino which is on a hilltop between Rome and Naples. He was abbot of

this monastery until his death on 21st March 547. Monte Cassino became the focal

point for western monasticism. The monks there followed the Rule of Saint Benedict

which he first wrote in 516 while in Subiaco. The Rule encouraged the monks to

devote eight hours per day to prayer, eight hours to sleep and eight hours to manual

work, sacred reading and/or works of charity.

 

=======================

Prayers

Perseverance

The perseverance of the sower challenges us to ask ourselves: "What can I

resolve to do today that could eventually make a big difference to my own life and

the lives of others?" For, no matter how small the seed sown, when that spirit of

generosity, hope and perseverance are present, the result can be remarkable.

When things go wrong as they sometimes will;

When the road you're trudging seems all uphill;

When the funds are low, and the debts are high;

And you want to smile, but you have to sigh;

When care is pressing you down a bit -

Rest if you must but do not quit.

Success is failure turned inside out;

The silver tint of the clouds of doubt;

And you can never tell how close you are;

It may be near when it seems afar.

So stick to the fight when you're hardest hit -

It's when things go wrong that you must never quit.

 

-----------------

 

Alive.ie

An Túr Gloine and the Idea of Excellence

By Patrick O Neill -August 31, 2020

Catholics need not labour under the illusion that excellence in the arts is a quality in the sole preserve of the secular world, as this quotation from the Apostle, and patron of writers, in Philippians 4:8 will disabuse them.

 

“Finally, brethren, let your minds be filled with everything that is true, honourable, upright and pure, everything that we love and admire – with whatever is good and praiseworthy.”

Christchurch Church of Ireland, Gorey, contains several stained-glass windows by An Túr Gloine artists, such as Harry Clarke, Catherine O’Brien and Ethel Rhind.

Like many Church of Ireland buildings in Ireland, it tells in microcosm, the history of stained-glass production in Ireland, seen in the transition from traditional windows manufactured in foundries in England and Germany to Irish modernist individualised production.

ATG was organised in response to the upsurge in the building of Catholic Churches following Catholic Emancipation, and in particular, the stained glass windows of Saint Brendan’s Cathedral, Loughrea. Supported by Edward Martyn and WB Yeats of the Celtic Revival, painter Sarah Purser financed and administered An Túr Gloine from its foundation in Upper Pembroke Street, Dublin, in 1903 to 1940; arranging for London tutor AE Child to travel and instruct in stained-glass at the Dublin School of Art.

The co-operative aimed to produce stained-glass for churches and buildings in Ireland created by artists in Ireland. Exploring Celtic subject matter, they were guided by the principles of the Arts and Crafts movement in which, “each window is the work of one artist who makes the sketch and … selects and paints every morsel of glass.”

ATG and the St. Brendan’s decorative scheme are intricately linked, to the extent that, according to Wikipedia, the Cathedral “houses the most extensive collection of Arts and Crafts and Celtic Revival artefacts of any single building in Ireland”, representing the works of nearly all the artists associated with ATG over four decades: Michael Healy, Alfred Child, Sarah Purser, Beatrice Elvery, Ethel Rhind, Hubert McGoldrick, Catherine O’Brien and Evie Hone.

As a result, Ireland became world famous as a centre for stained-glass production at this time and several of its members achieved global prominence.

It’s easy to access art located in churches by entering off the street as is the case with Christchurch in Gorey, although the more remote Church of Ireland buildings may require prior arrangement and Covid has seen temporary closures. In the meanwhile, the Church of Ireland has an excellent online archive of stained-glass researched by Dr. David Lawrence at www.gloine.ie.

In Christchurch, you can view the work of Harry Clarke, who designed the ‘Geneva Window’ (1930) for the International Labour Organisation in Geneva (now in the Wolfsonian Museum, Miami, Florida), the windows of Bewley’s café on Grafton Street, Dublin, as well as the ‘Baptism of Jesus’ (1924) at the Chapel of the Sacred Heart, Dingle, County Kerry.

 

This success happened as a result of the deliberate organisation of stained-glass production in Ireland into a centre of excellence run by native practitioners under tuition of overseas experts in the early days.

What lessons can we apply from An Túr Gloine today? It’s possible to organise a centre of excellence in any art form as a group and also to apply the principles of excellence to individual artistic endeavour.

Excellence in any area refers to the idea of distinction, quality, brilliance and greatness all coming from integrity, passion, creativity, innovation and commitment.

The exhortation from Saint Paul marks a useful starting point for the idea that when we focus on what is excellent and virtuous in life and art, we can replicate these standards in Christian art by our own efforts, with God’s help, following the example of earlier Irish artists such as those of An Túr Gloine.

http://alive.ie/uncategorized/an-tur-gloine-and-the-idea-of-excellence/

 

=======================

More than half of Alito’s 98-page draft opinion, in the pending Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization case, explores the history of U.S. abortion law in order to establish that the “right to abortion” is not “deeply rooted in this nation’s history and tradition” as it would have to be in order to be protected by the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment. He wrote that “until the latter part of the 20th century, such a right was entirely unknown in American law.”

In his discussion of the history of abortion law, Alito cited Joseph Dellapenna, Villanova Law professor emeritus and author of Dispelling the Myths of Abortion History who filed an amicus brief in the case. 

Dellapenna told the Register that Roe gave “an argument about the history of abortion in order to come up with a conclusion that there is an unenumerated right to choose abortion that is protected by the Constitution.” Justice Harry Blackmun devoted “between a third and a half” of his Roe opinion rooting “the idea that there is a constitutional right to choose to abort in his version of the history.”

https://www.ncregister.com/news/correcting-roe-s-flawed-revision-of-abortion-history?utm_campaign=NCR&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=216142079&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--2S1TPTBFikx-51ftHFQZH_CQFvBIPP6jFkH5Sv9Vkc3kMv4LBSfmqVYOwf7uuwwEZsDSSNTpJY71039p0qDr6whkChg&utm_content=216142079&utm_source=hs_email

 

 

--------------------------

7 Amazing Eucharistic Miracles

These miracles have left incredible impressions on the individuals and communities where they occurred.

https://www.beliefnet.com/faiths/catholic/7-amazing-eucharistic-miracles.aspx

 

-----------------------------

Mass was celenrated for Fr Kevin in Moyvane County Kerry on 26 June 2022, Fr O Connell and three other priests con celebrated.

Video link

https://youtu.be/e5fLO2k-ZjY

Filename

Tribute to Father Kevin.mp4

==================================

MEMORIAL MASS in thanksgiving for Fr. Kevin's life will take place on Wednesday 29th June at 7.30pm in St. Agatha's Church, Glenflesk. There will be refreshments afterwards in Glenflesk GAA Hall. All are welcome

---------------------

 

2022 June 29 Knockanure

 

KNOCKANURE

 

Memorial and Thanksgiving Mass for Fr. Kevin will take place on Sunday 26th June at 2pm at Moyvane Church, at the Doorway of Hope (weather permitting), in memory of the Covid Masses. After Mass a plaque will be unveiled in his honour. Everybody very welcome.

 

 

 

TRIBUTES to Maureen Sweeney nee Flavin born in Knockanure 99 years, are numerous, she had been forgotten for many years and it was great to learn more about her achievements and the benefit derived from her work. https://youtu.be/X8hj9BEcrXc

 

Filename- Tribute Maureen Flavin Sweeney June 2022

 

Tribute in Knockanure can be viewed on www.facebook.com/Pixieskingdom

 

 

 

BEST WISHES to Mrs Julienne Donegan on her retirement as Principal of Knockanure Scoil Chorp Chriost. Mass was celebrated by Fr. Tom McMahon and Fr. Brendan O’Callaghan. A host of parishioners and family members, contributed to the occasion. Celebrations continued with gathering at the school also. Best Wishes also to  Ms. Kate McSweeney and Mr. Brendan Walsh who finished their term in Scoil Chorp Chríost recently. We want to thank them both for their commitment to pupils and for all the work that they have done in the school.

 

CONGRATULATIONS to Han Scanlon, nee Neligan of Direen, on her 100th Birthday, she has many connections in the parish. Congratulations also to 99-year-old Betty Moody who treated all her neighbours in Moyvane with a 99.

 

Congratulations also to Fr. Jack O’Donnell on his Golden Jubilee, ordained for the Diocese of Duluth, Minnesota, USA on June 18th 1972 in All Hallows College, Dublin.

 

PADRE Pio & 1st Friday Mass at 6.45pm in Listowel.

 

Fr Kevin; MY FINAL TEN SECOND SERMON Just one Ten Second Sermon, in the week that’s in it. I take my leave of you on Wednesday for Glenflesk, Barraduff and Clonkeen. The Sermon is as follows: “Think – Thank”. If we stopped to think more, we would stop to thank more. When I reflect on my time in your Parish, I am full of thanks for so many things – your help, love, support, prayers, the ways we stayed and prayed together from the word go when C19 arrived. But above all your hospitality, kindness and the many smiles we shared together. In prayer let us continue to support each other. God Bless each and everyone of you. Love & prayers, Fr. Kevin.

 

---------------------------------------

 

 

Naveen – A tribute

 

Mar 2, 2022

 

 

 

    #children#pain#War#Sorrow#CallforPeace

 

 

 

Naveen – A tribute - featured image

 

 

 

'Naveen' means fresh, creative, bright

 

'Naveen' was my mom's youngest brother's name

 

"He died when he was two," my grandma told me

 

with a tear in her eye.

 

"A long, long time ago."

 

 

 

Yesterday, Naveen died once again

 

This time, he was twenty-one

 

A year older than my daughter is now

 

He was studying to be a doctor-

 

Learning to not give up, learning to give hope

 

 

 

It wasn't just Naveen who died-

 

Yesterday

 

But all the people Naveen could have

 

saved; had he lived.

 

They died too, yesterday.

 

 

 

And with him, 'Hope'- she died as well

 

She was hurled out yesterday

 

By 'Reality'.

 

They say it's not the government's fault; I agree

 

They say Naveen should have evacuated; I agree

 

 

 

But, Naveen was twenty-one;

 

A child, still- filled with hope

 

and disbelief in

 

the possibility of War;

 

So, he stayed on; but it wasn't for long

 

 

 

'Reality' plucked him; it shook our core

 

And we cried - for Naveen and for every child

 

Who dares to dream

 

And has his dreams ripped apart

 

In an unfair world.

 

 

 

 

 

This poem is a tribute to the 21 year old medical student, Naveen, who lost his life yesterday

 

in the war in Ukraine. May his soul rest in peace and may God give his family strength.

 

Our prayers are with all those who are stuck in the middle of conflict for no fault of theirs.

 

May God have mercy.

 

 

 

Copyright@smithavishwanathsblog.com. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

https://wordpress.com/read/blogs/40872617/posts/42397

 

 

 

 

 

 

 =============================

 

 

A Remnant Remains

 

In the First Reading, Elijah is weighed down by the darkness of Israel's sins. To alleviate this depression, he goes to the only one who can comfort him: God. In response to the prophet's prayer, the Lord shows him that he is not alone. In a world plagued by faithlessness, we must listen to these words, too. We are not alone.

 

Empowered Righteousness

 

Christ doesn't only want us to follow the commandments; he wants us to be animated by love. To help us achieve this calling, God sent us the Holy Spirit on Pentecost. Now, empowered by grace, we find strength to love God and neighbor, and we recognize how we have fallen short in the past.

 

-----------------------

 

Perseverance

 

The perseverance of the sower challenges us to ask ourselves: "What can I

 

resolve to do today that could eventually make a big difference to my own life and

 

the lives of others?" For, no matter how small the seed sown, when that spirit of

 

generosity, hope and perseverance are present, the result can be remarkable.

 

When things go wrong as they sometimes will;

 

When the road you're trudging seems all uphill;

 

When the funds are low, and the debts are high;

 

And you want to smile, but you have to sigh;

 

When care is pressing you down a bit -

 

Rest if you must but do not quit.

 

Success is failure turned inside out;

 

The silver tint of the clouds of doubt;

 

And you can never tell how close you are;

 

It may be near when it seems afar.

 

So stick to the fight when you're hardest hit -

 

It's when things go wrong that you must never quit.

 

 

 

-----------------

 

 

---------------------------

 

RECEIPE FOR HAPPINESS

 

Two cups of patience,

 

One heart full of love,

 

Two handfuls of generosity

 

A dash of laughter,

 

One handful of understanding.

 

Sprinkle generously with kindness,

 

Add plenty of faith and mix well.

 

Spread over a period of time.

 

Serve to everyone you meet.

 

--------------------------------------

 

NOVENA TO THE SACRED HEART – 16TH – 24TH JUNE.  

 

O divine Jesus who said “Ask and you shall receive, seek and you shall find, knock and the door shall be opened to you.  I kneel at your feet.  From whom shall I ask if not from you, whose heart is the source of all blessings. O Divine Jesus your Heart was moved by compassion for the men and women who came to you in need.  You healed the sick, you forgave sinners.  You are the Way, the Truth, and the Life.  O Divine Jesus your heart is still full of compassion for us today in our many needs.  Assured of your love we turn to you and ask …(mention your requests).  I admit I am most unworthy of your favour, Jesus, but this is not a reason for me to be discouraged.   You are the God of mercies, and you will not refuse a contrite heart.  Look with pity on me, I beg you so that your compassionate heart will find in my weakness a motive for granting my request.   May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be everywhere loved.  Our Lady of the Sacred Heart pray for us.   Amen.

 

-----------------------------------------

 

======================

June 2022

 

Prayers

 

 

 

Spirit of wisdom and understanding, enlighten our minds to perceive the mysteries

 

of the universe in relation to eternity.

 

Spirit of right judgement and courage, guide us and make us firm in our baptismal

 

decision to follow Jesus' way of love.

 

Spirit of knowledge and reverence, help us to see the lasting value of justice and

 

mercy in our everyday dealings with one another. May we respect life as we work

 

to solve problems of family and nation, economy and ecology.

 

Spirit of God, spark our faith, hope and love into new action each day.

 

Fill our lives with wonder and awe in your presence which penetrates all creation.

 

And enable our weakness, come as Holy Life and dwell within us.

 

Convict us, convert us, consecrate us, until we are set free from the service of

 

ourselves, to be your servants to the world. Amen.

 

 

 

-------------------------------------------

 

Pentecost, A prayer to the Holy Spirit- Come, Holy Spirit, Creator, come,

 

From your bright heavenly Throne, Come, take possession of us And make us yours.

 

O guide our minds with your blessed light, With love our hearts welcome. Through you may we the Father know, Through you the Eternal Son, And you, Spirit of Both, Thrice blessed, three in one,

 

All glory to the Father, Son, And Spirit.

 

 

 

STUDENT EXAM PRAYER:

 

We pray for our young people who are preparing for exams. We wish

 

them every success and God’s blessing during these days, that each

 

may do their own personal best and find calm in God’s peace.

 

Loving God, each day as I step further into my future,

 

give me the courage, knowledge and patience

 

that I need during the exams ahead.

 

Remind me that you always journey with me

 

and that you will never lead me into anything

 

that you won't lead me through.

 

Thank you for the gift of my life.

 

May the way I live be my gift back to you –

 

with your love and guidance in Jesus' name. AMEN

 

 

 

St John Paul II Prayer to the Holy Spirit

 

Holy Spirit, I ask you for the gift of Wisdom to better know You and Your

 

divine perfections, for the gift of Understanding to clearly discern the

 

spirit of the mysteries of the holy faith, for the gift of Counsel that I may

 

live according to the principles of this faith, for the gift of Knowledge that I

 

may look for counsel in You and that I may always find it in You, for the

 

gift of Fortitude that no fear or earthly preoccupations would ever

 

separate me from You, for the gift of piety that I may always serve Your

 

Majesty with a filial love, for the gift of Fear of the Lord that I may dread

 

sin, which offends You, O my God. Amen

 

 

 

2022; This Sunday June 5th (Pentecost Sunday) has been designated as a Day of Prayer in Thanksgiving for the Diocesan Phase of the Universal Synod.  On 10 March 2021, the Irish Catholic Bishops’ Conference announced a new Synodal Pathway for the Catholic Church in Ireland leading to the holding of a National Synodal Assembly or Assemblies within the next five years.

 

This process has been focusing on the question:

 

What does God want from the Church in Ireland at this time?

 

More details on www.synod.ie  The term synod comes from the Greek for ‘together on the way’. Synodality is a way of being Church, it is a spiritual practice and not just a debate about how the church is organised. It is intended to facilitate a wide-ranging process of reflection and discernment. All the faithful are invited to take part in the Synodal Pathway. Recently we had own gathering for Listowel Pastoral Area. Each Diocese is now submitting a document on the findings nationally. A

 

National Pre Synodal-Assembly will take place in Athlone on Saturday, 18th June with a closing liturgy, before the final submission is sent to the Vatican.

 

 

 

PRAYER FOR THE PEOPLE OF UKRAINE

 

Loving God, We pray for the

 

people of Ukraine, For all

 

those suffering or afraid,

 

that you will be close to

 

them and protect them.

 

We pray for world leaders, for compassion,

 

strength and wisdom to guide their choices.

 

We pray for the world; that in this moment of

 

crisis, we may reach out in solidarity to our

 

brothers and sisters in need.

 

May we walk in your ways so that peace and

 

justice become a reality for the people of Ukraine

 

and for all the world. Amen.

 

Our Lady, Queen of Peace, pray for us!

 

Our Lady of Kyiv, pray for us!

 

 

 

Sacred Art: The Visitation

 

 

 

Learn theology through a discussion on sacred art! Join Dr. Ben Akers and Taylor Kemp as they dive into an 18th-century depiction of the biblical scene of the Visitation and discuss the theology behind it.

 

 

 

The Power of the Spirit

 

 

 

Many beautiful truths are revealed in Christ's High Priestly Prayer. For example, Jesus reveals that we are called to participate in the trinitarian communion of love. As Dr. Gray points out, this message foreshadows Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit descended upon the disciples, empowering the Church with divine life.

 

 

 

A Shared Endeavor

 

 

 

At the end of John's Gospel account, Jesus calls Peter to participate in his role as the shepherd of the flock. Through apostolic succession, this mission is passed down to all ordained ministers. As Dr. Gray notes, however, the laity has a part to play as well. Indeed, each and every one of the baptized has a responsibility to share the truth of the Gospel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

====================

 

The Gifts of the Holy Spirit

 

 

 

After the Feast of the Ascension, the Church directs our eyes toward Pentecost. To remind us of the great gifts of the Holy Spirit, the Church liturgically relives the events of Pentecost. Turn toward the Holy Spirit in prayer today, asking him to prepare you to receive him more fully on Pentecost.

 

The Joy of the Gospel

 

 

 

The feasting continues as today we celebrate the Visitation! Mary, after receiving the good news of the Annunciation, rushes to share her joy with her cousin, Elizabeth. Like Mary, share the good news of what God has done in your life with those around you.

 

God Is Truth

 

 

 

In today's Gospel, Jesus prepares the Church for the descent of the Holy Spirit. Through him, the Spirit of Truth, our minds find illumination, and our wills receive strength. In other words, the grace of the Spirit consecrates us in the truth and helps us become faithful witnesses in a confused world.

 

 

 

 

 

====================================

May 2022

 

CHINA

 

 

 

Bishop Thomas Tobin of Providence tweeted “Pray for Cardinal Joseph Zen, 90 years of age, who has been unjustly arrested by the Chinese Communists, and for all those in the world who suffer for their Catholic Faith. Though separated by distance, we stand in complete solidarity with today’s heroes and martyrs."

 

 

 

Bishop Joseph Strickland of Tyler responded to Tobin by tweeting, “Thank you Bishop Tobin and others for your support of Cardinal Zen….let us pray that all bishops, priests, deacons and faithful join us in prayer and call for Justice for Cardinal Zen.”

 

 

 

In a tweet, former member of Congress Dan Lipinski [D-IL] took aim at the Chinese Communist Party for Zen's arrest.

 

 

 

“The Chinese Communist Party apparently fears 90 year old Catholic Cardinal Zen so much that they arrest him for his pro-democracy work,” Lipinski said. “It’s appalling that China has taken over democratic Hong Kong while the world watches, mostly in silence.”

 

 

 

Melissa Chan, a reporter and former VICE News correspondent, tweeted that “It's hard to explain to those who've never lived in Hong Kong just what a fixture Cardinal Zen is in the city.”

 

 

 

She added, “Even for those who are not Catholics, he symbolized for decades moral fortitude, goodness, and so much of what was great about Hong Kong. Now he's arrested.”

 

 

 

Shibani Mahtani, the Southeast Asia bureau chief for The Washington Post, tweeted that “Hong Kong’s pro-Beijing faction always highlights the vandalism, Molotov cocktails and violence of 2019 as a reason for the national security law — so why have they used it to go after veteran critics and dissidents, including now 90 year old Cardinal Zen?”

 

 

 

Hong Kong Law Fellow at the Georgetown Center for Asian Law Eric Yan-ho Lai tweeted that “The arrest of Cardinal Zen @CardJosephZen, echoed the arrest of Cardinal Kung Pin-mei,who was jailed by the Communist Party as he refused to surrender to the state controlling the Church in 1950s. Many Catholic bishops were persecuted on the mainland, and now #HK.”

 

 

 

https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251203/cardinal-zen-arrest-a-roundup-of-reactions?utm_campaign=CNA%20Daily&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=212896150&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9lVzYNKBiYKsMn0EjYJAJOMOV70sFjYDKDAiw9zQRybT6YFj1bz-IM0IruSfos9s_34QTRxu-tPDO3nSjg54Gqkh9LxA&utm_content=212896150&utm_source=hs_email

 

 

==============================

 

Prayers

 

 

 

Inseparable Gifts

 

 

 

As Dr. Gray points out, the Athenians saw themselves as paragons of wisdom. Ironically, this prideful self-image prevented them from recognizing Christ as Wisdom itself. In this event, we see that humility is necessary for the Gospel to flourish. So, let us pray for the gift of humility, which opens us up to God's ways.

 

The Divine Enthronement

 

 

 

In the Ascension, Christ is enthroned as the King of Kings, adorned with all power and glory. Now he sits at the right hand of the Father, interceding for us. This enthronement does not make Christ distant, however. Through the gift of the Spirit, which was given on Pentecost, we are brought into our Redeemer's life.

 

 

 

Blast the Trumpets

 

 

 

The readings today emphasize the central theme of Eastertide: joy. Through Christ's victory over sin and death, we have been brought into the divine life. Our response to this indescribable gift can only be joy. So, let's unite our voices with that of the Psalmist, singing in thanksgiving for the Lord's love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christ Illuminates

 

 

 

Today, the Gospel reminds us that Christ is the light that illuminates all things. Sin, on the other hand, is darkness. It clouds our intellects, distorts our moral vision, and pulls us from eternal happiness. With this lesson in mind, let's remain faithful to Christ. Let's let him guide us!

 

 

 

Sharing in His Life

 

 

 

As baptized Christians, we share in the life of Christ through the Holy Spirit. Indeed, we have been empowered to become other Christs, so to speak. In this life, we must remember that prayer, charity, and the sacraments are vital. Without each of these, we can not effectively preach the Gospel.

 

Omniscient & Omnipotent

 

 

 

St. Peter shows us that the key to success is cooperation with the divine will. Indeed, he knows that God is ultimately in control of all things. Today, this lesson is especially important to remember. As the world darkens, let's take solace in the fact that God will win in the end, even if we can't see victory on the horizon.

 

 

 

=======================

 

Jubilarians are hailed for their prayers, compassion, and service

 

 

 

DOUGLASTON — A collective 6,780 years of service to God was celebrated on Saturday, May 7, as women and men religious from the Diocese of Brooklyn gathered at Immaculate Conception Center for their Jubilee Mass.

 

 

 

The Mass, which was celebrated by Bishop Robert Brennan, is held each year to honor the contributions of women and men religious who are marking the 25th, 50th, 60th, 65th, 70th, and 75th anniversaries of taking their vows. It also provides an opportunity for the jubilarians to stand in church and publicly renew those vows in the presence of the bishop.

 

 

 

There were 112 jubilarians honored this year. Sister Maryann Seton Lopiccolo S.C., the episcopal delegate for the religious in the diocese, noted to the honorees that collectively they had amassed almost-7,000 years of service to the Church.

 

 

 

Because the pandemic prevented a Jubilee Mass in 2020 and caused a scaled-down celebration in 2021, this year saw jubilarians from all three years — 2020, 2021, and 2022 — honored on Saturday.

 

 

 

Last year, Sister Maryann worked with Bishop Emeritus Nicholas DiMarzio to come up with a creative way to salute the jubilarians despite the ongoing pandemic. They organized a hybrid celebration in which Bishop DiMarzio celebrated Mass at the Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph, and a six-minute video created by DeSales Media Group — the communications and technology ministry of the diocese — was presented on NET-TV immediately afterward.

 

 

 

The lack of large-scale celebrations last year and the year before made this year’s Mass even more special, participants said.

 

 

 

“The last two years have been a challenge. Well, we’re finally here. We are celebrating special milestones in our journey,” said Sister Maryann, who marked her 50th year as a Sister of Charity – Halifax in 2020.

 

 

 

Women and men religious have made their mark over the decades in the fields of education, health care, and social work but have also made valuable contributions in private by helping people one-on-one, Bishop Brennan noted.

 

https://thetablet.org/we-are-celebrating-special-milestones-in-our-journey/?utm_campaign=Daily%20Headlines&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=212475168&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--XeoWzdq-E15xY3ePfu8SBTHBB9ZiBfhdEwYKH2MW_BlIV76ZKsWoUOOcSO1ESOJkiLD6eJPPwop_CQWGBSq8GMEYcFQ&utm_content=212475168&utm_source=hs_email

 

 

 

==============================

 

Senate lawmakers fail in making access to abortions a federal law. We’ll hear from the New York bishops about this latest development.

 

Reaction from around the world is coming in over the arrest of Archbishop Emeritus Joseph Zen in Hong Kong.

 

Americans are being forced to make tough choices because of skyrocketing prices for essential goods.

 

A WWII veteran and Tuskegee airman gets his request for birthday cards answered in a big way.

 

 

 

https://netny.tv/episodes/currents/catholic-news-headlines-for-thursday-5-12-22/?utm_campaign=Daily%20Headlines&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=213046125&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_vSOYLFldpuaHxDTrRnCjhtldSEQHU3TJdIprDvjgh2xFTWNsXmT9k38XSvcSr89NPxu0_IRqpYwAIsRp5FTZrrUupUw&utm_content=213046125&utm_source=hs_email

 

 

 

=================================

 

==================================

 

Christ Illuminates

 

 

 

Today, the Gospel reminds us that Christ is the light that illuminates all things. Sin, on the other hand, is darkness. It clouds our intellects, distorts our moral vision, and pulls us from eternal happiness. With this lesson in mind, let's remain faithful to Christ. Let's let him guide us!

 

 

 

Sharing in His Life

 

 

 

As baptized Christians, we share in the life of Christ through the Holy Spirit. Indeed, we have been empowered to become other Christs, so to speak. In this life, we must remember that prayer, charity, and the sacraments are vital. Without each of these, we can not effectively preach the Gospel.

 

Omniscient & Omnipotent

 

 

 

St. Peter shows us that the key to success is cooperation with the divine will. Indeed, he knows that God is ultimately in control of all things. Today, this lesson is especially important to remember. As the world darkens, let's take solace in the fact that God will win in the end, even if we can't see victory on the horizon.

 

 

 

Eternal Life

 

 

 

In the Book of Revelation, John sees a multitude wearing white robes. These individuals are those who clung to Christ throughout their lives and now enjoy eternal life with him. Moreover, as Paul and Barnabas preached, all peoples—Jews and Gentiles alike—are called to joyfully journey toward this heavenly end.

 

 

 

===========================

 

7 Things You Should Say to Your Kids Every Day

 

https://www.familytoday.com/family/7-things-you-should-say-to-your-kids-every-day/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=lovefam&fbclid=IwAR21JFIYuWPwCe-TY8ywc_QEAHpDicgRqlsKf6DyTwX2DEyyo7y4r0oiClU

 

=======================

 

CHINA

 

 

 

Bishop Thomas Tobin of Providence tweeted “Pray for Cardinal Joseph Zen, 90 years of age, who has been unjustly arrested by the Chinese Communists, and for all those in the world who suffer for their Catholic Faith. Though separated by distance, we stand in complete solidarity with today’s heroes and martyrs."

 

 

 

Bishop Joseph Strickland of Tyler responded to Tobin by tweeting, “Thank you Bishop Tobin and others for your support of Cardinal Zen….let us pray that all bishops, priests, deacons and faithful join us in prayer and call for Justice for Cardinal Zen.”

 

 

 

In a tweet, former member of Congress Dan Lipinski [D-IL] took aim at the Chinese Communist Party for Zen's arrest.

 

 

 

“The Chinese Communist Party apparently fears 90 year old Catholic Cardinal Zen so much that they arrest him for his pro-democracy work,” Lipinski said. “It’s appalling that China has taken over democratic Hong Kong while the world watches, mostly in silence.”

 

 

 

Melissa Chan, a reporter and former VICE News correspondent, tweeted that “It's hard to explain to those who've never lived in Hong Kong just what a fixture Cardinal Zen is in the city.”

 

 

 

She added, “Even for those who are not Catholics, he symbolized for decades moral fortitude, goodness, and so much of what was great about Hong Kong. Now he's arrested.”

 

 

 

Shibani Mahtani, the Southeast Asia bureau chief for The Washington Post, tweeted that “Hong Kong’s pro-Beijing faction always highlights the vandalism, Molotov cocktails and violence of 2019 as a reason for the national security law — so why have they used it to go after veteran critics and dissidents, including now 90 year old Cardinal Zen?”

 

 

 

Hong Kong Law Fellow at the Georgetown Center for Asian Law Eric Yan-ho Lai tweeted that “The arrest of Cardinal Zen @CardJosephZen, echoed the arrest of Cardinal Kung Pin-mei,who was jailed by the Communist Party as he refused to surrender to the state controlling the Church in 1950s. Many Catholic bishops were persecuted on the mainland, and now #HK.”

 

 

 

https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251203/cardinal-zen-arrest-a-roundup-of-reactions?utm_campaign=CNA%20Daily&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=212896150&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9lVzYNKBiYKsMn0EjYJAJOMOV70sFjYDKDAiw9zQRybT6YFj1bz-IM0IruSfos9s_34QTRxu-tPDO3nSjg54Gqkh9LxA&utm_content=212896150&utm_source=hs_email

 

=================================

 

=====================================

 

The Good Shepherd

 

 

 

In Jesus’ time, being a shepherd was not a pleasant job. Sheep became easily lost and the shepherd’s job was to guide them back to safety. There were many dangers and the sheep were totally dependent on the shepherd. Shepherds would round up their sheep in the evening and guide them into their pen. But it had no gate, so the shepherd would lie across the space in case the sheep were attacked at night. The shepherds literally lay down their lives for their flock. John compares the sacrifice of the shepherd to the ‘hired hand’ who is not really committed to the flock. He does what he has to but flees at the first sign of trouble.

 

This Good Shepherd Sunday the Gospel describes Jesus as the ‘genuine’ Shepherd who wants a personal relationship with each one of us and who would lay down his life for us. The Gospel emphasises the importance of relationship as the shepherd knows his flock and cares for them. They ‘follow Him’ and it is not a Facebook or Twitter type of following, rather it is a genuine relationship. Everyone matters to the Good Shepherd, regardless of their situations. We are told ‘I know my own and my own know me’. We are called today to follow Jesus in a more personal more intimate way. Even when we stray off the path and get lost, it is then especially that the Good Shepherd comes looking for us.

 

 

 

---------------------------------

 

HEARING GOD’S VOICE In today's Gospel Jesus was drawing on a well

 

-known image at the time of a shepherd calling his sheep. We might not

 

have the same familiarity with what He means, but even today in Israel

 

you will find different flocks pasturing together in a sheep fold or

 

scattered throughout the hills, but when their own shepherd calls them

 

they respond to him and follow. It's incredible to see! How can they know

 

his particular voice? They know their shepherd because they trust him;

 

he provides for them, cares for them, keeps them safe from harm. In fact,

 

he protects him with his own life if necessary, facing down threats like

 

wolves and thieves for their sake. Jesus is the Good Shepherd - He

 

doesn't give Himself that title in this Gospel passage, but elsewhere.

 

That makes us, as baptised Christians, His sheep. But a really important

 

question for us to ask is not just "do we listen to His voice?" but rather,

 

since we have free will, "do we want to listen to His voice?" Do we

 

believe that Jesus knows what is best for us? Do we trust that He will

 

always provide? Do we turn to Him for help and advice? Are we

 

drowning out His voice with other noise or voice?

 

 

 

===================================

 

 

 

===========================

 

This is an interview I carried out with John Moriarty in 2001. It was originally written for the killareny.ie website, which I ran at the time and which is now defunct. I met John in Killarney and later drove him to his home on the side of Mangerton Mountain. He wrote nine books, most of them huge ponderous things but which carry you along. John died in 2007 from cancer.

 

https://ecopunks.blogspot.com/2008/10/john-moriarty.html

 

 

 

===================================

 

======================

29 April 2022

 

Awake, O Sleeper

 

 

 

Christ's Resurrection is a shocking reality. Through his Resurrection, our Lord shows us what we are to hope for. Indeed, by faithfully following him and calling upon his holy name, we can share in his glorification. In other words, we can rise from the dead, too.

 

Preach and Proclaim

 

 

 

In an effort to subdue the early Christians, the Sanhedrin order Peter and John to stop proclaiming the Gospel. The Apostles, however, will not be silent. They have witnessed the power of Christ, and they must spread the good news. Today, let us proclaim what Christ has done in our lives!

 

Spirit

 

New Life

 

 

 

In today's Gospel, the risen Christ visits his disciples in the Upper Room. After showing them his wounds, Christ breathed the Holy Spirit into his followers. In this act, Jesus echoed the creation of Adam, thereby revealing that we have new life in the Resurrection. Like Thomas, let us proclaim this good news with faith and joy!

 

Reconciled

 

 

 

Though they were fueled by the fire of charity, St. Mark and St. Paul clashed. As Acts attests, they parted ways after a disagreement. However, they each spread the Gospel to the nations and eventually reconciled with each other. Inspired by these Saints, let us try to heal broken relationships in our own lives!

 

Flowing from Faith

 

 

 

The Acts of the Apostles describes the golden age of the Church. In this book, St. Luke tells us about the supernatural charity that flowed out of the disciples' supernatural faith. Indeed, through their words and deeds, the early Christians spread the good news of Christ's love and Resurrection to the world.

 

 

 

Empowered by the Spirit

 

 

 

After the Resurrection and Pentecost, the Gospel spread like wildfire. In this "first evangelization," the Apostles were empowered by the Holy Spirit. Today, we must adopt the same strategy in the new evangelization. We must be docile to God's work within us, allowing him to renew his Church.

 

 

 

 

 

The Way, the Truth, the Life

 

 

 

In today's First Reading, an angel releases the apostles from prison and exhorts them to continue preaching and teaching the Good News. The message they preach is dynamic and powerful: knowing Jesus changes the shape of our lives, radically orienting us toward God and his Kingdom.