===================================

 

"He would spend hours and whole days in those slums working with Indian doctors. He would start vaccinating in the morning before people went to work, and continue after they came back in the evenings, sitting by an oil lamp in the slum."

 

 

 

Haffkine's work in the Calcutta slums placed him among a select group of scientists who pioneered a profound and global shift in the way disease was understood and treated. But unlike Edward Jenner before him and Jonas Salk after, Haffkine's name never really entered the public imagination, either in India or in Europe.

 

 

 

"Haffkine was the first person who brought that kind of laboratory medicine into a tropical country like India," Professor Chakrabarti said.

 

 

 

"He was a Paris scientist who came to the slums of Calcutta. He has a very dramatic story."

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-55050012?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB

 

=======================================

 

From Maine Valley Post 16 Dec 2020

 

Currow Murder Raised in UK Parliament

 

 

 

The treatment and ultimate murder of John O’Connor were deemed so barbaric that the case was raised in the House of Commons at the time.

 

 

 

The event and others like it served to highlight the unjust acts of violence carried out in communities across Kerry during this time.

 

 

 

“On the day of the murder, John O’Connor was searched and arrested. He was taken in a lorry in the direction of Farranfore,” said O’Connor family representative, Cora O’Connor.

 

 

 

Legs and Hands Broken

 

 

 

“Before arriving in Farranfore the Tans threw John O’Connor from the lorry. Already badly beaten and injured from the fall, they fired at him and wounded him badly.

 

 

 

“Maurice Keane, a witness, stated hearing shots and a man groaning in pain calling out ‘Maurice come to me for God’s sake I’m dying.’

 

 

 

“It is stated that his legs and hands were broken and he was bleeding from gunshot wounds.

 

 

 

“John O’Connor was carried to a nearby house in Threegneeves, Currow. They propped him in the bed beside the fire.

 

 

 

The Last Sacraments

 

 

 

“Father O’Sullivan, parish priest at the time, arrived to deliver the Last Sacraments and a private motor car then returned from Farranfore.

 

 

 

Father O’Sullivan’s witness statement recalls ‘one person in the house felt someone was at the window.’

 

 

 

“It was a figure clad in the attire of RIC policemen. Three men entered in military uniform.

 

 

 

“They cleared out the occupants of the kitchen. They then sat John O’Connor upright in the bed, already dying of his injuries.

 

 

 

Three Bullets to the Head

 

 

 

“They murdered him by firing three revolver bullets into his head. They left and returned to Farranfore,” said Cora from family lore and her own research.

 

 

 

The murder sparked outrage in the community and the Currow volunteers grew from 41 members to 127, as all young men joined due to the outrage of the unjustified murder.

 

 

 

“Kate O’Connor was left a widow by this brutal act and had to raise seven children on her own,” – Cora continued.

 

 

 

“This incident at the time was such an outrage that it was raised in the House of Commons in the UK.

 

 

 

Innocent and Inoffensive

 

 

 

“An investigation was held and John O’Connor’s body was exhumed to establish the extent of his injuries.

 

 

 

In the hearing he was described as a 45-year-old farmer of 50 acres. He was defined as an ‘innocent’ and inoffensive man.’

 

 

 

“The hearing concluded by the judge stated that ‘he saw no excuse whatsoever for this occurrence.’

 

 

 

“A memorial was erected on the road where he was thrown down from the lorry and fired on. His memory resonates in the community and with his family to this day.”

 

 

 

This article is based on the research and writings of Cora O’Connor, who is a great-great granddaughter of John O’Connor.

 

 

 

Click for Bureau Statements

 

 

 

Thanks to Denny McSweeney you can read witness statements on the John O’Connor murder from page five in the Bureau of Military History. 1913 – 1921 by witness John J. Walsh of Lyre, Farranfore. Please Click on the link below here:

 

 

 

https://www.militaryarchives.ie/collections/online-collections/bureau-of-military-history-1913-1921/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1002.pdf

 

 

 

==================================

 

Republican Memorial Tributes 32

 

5tSrponshogredc  ·

 

#OTD - 22nd November 1920; Edward 'Eddie' Carmody, Ballylongford Company, No.1 Kerry Brigade is murdered by the RIC - 100 Years Ago.

 

Eddie came from the Ballylongford parish and joined the Irish Volunteers on their foundation in the area in 1914. After the split of the Volunteers (IV), many - rallying to the call of the British war effort by Redmond's National Volunteers to fight for Home Rule (in vain) in Flanders & Gallipoli etc. - the Ballylongford Company of the IV became inactive in his local parish. Although reorganised months before the 1916 Rising and waiting in anticipation, until they were stood down by Éoin MacNeill's counter-mander, and they never rose... much like the vast majority of Ireland. During April 1917, when Sinn Féin Clubs were formed, the Company became active again and Carmody became Second Lieutenant. During the Tan War the Company was to the forefront of the campaign in North Kerry.

 

On the morning of the 21st of November, the day that Bloody Sunday took place, a force of Black & Tans and regular RIC arrived in Ballylongford. Their mission to capture local IRA men. They began indiscriminately shooting and destroying civilian property, where they also looted public houses drinking copious amounts of alcohol at the expense of the publican.

 

Three IRA Volunteers, being - Óglaigh Brian Dillon, Edmond Hayes and Eddie Carmody - were in Brian O'Grady's house when the RIC arrived at the village. The house was on the Ballyline road on the outskirts. The three Volunteers exited from the rear and in a nearby village sports field is where Hayes volunteered to get three arms from an IRA weapons dump. This was so they could fire upon the RIC, if approached. The three Volunteers decided to meet at Rusheen, near the local doctor's house and went west of Ballylongford. Hayes managed to get one rifle and went searching for another two weapons. Carmody and Dillon were met by another Volunteer, Óglach Peter Deegan, who had fled the village centre.

 

After a while Eddie Carmody could here footsteps and thinking it was Hayes returning with weapons, stepped out onto the roadway. However, it was the RIC and Eddie began to run for his life. The RIC fired shots at him and one hit him in the back, but he managed to jump the doctor's wall; of which he hid behind. The RIC went looking and searching the home of the doctor and found nothing, but it was a bright moonlit night, and one spotted Carmody lying beneath the roadside wall of the garden. Eddie was dragged onto the road where they brutally executed him by kicking and beating him with rifle butts and stabbing him with bayonets before he was finally, and horrifically, shot in the face numerous times.

 

The RIC and Tans returned to Ballylongford village and burnt down the local creamery, saw mills and local shops. Carmody's body was dragged through the village until they reached the local barracks, where he was thrown into a turf shed. His father retrieved Eddie's remains the following day. Eddie Carmody is buried in Murhur Cemetery, near Moyvane. He was awarded full Military Honours and a volley of shots rang over his grave after burial.

 

The following year on the 12th December 1921, (during the Truce) the man responsible for Eddie's shooting, Sergeant John Maher was killed in a hail of bullets in the Green in Ballybunion.

 

 

 

Amelia Wilmot - A Forgotten Listowel Revolutionary Woman

 

Oct 23, 2020 -Kerry Writers' Museum

 

While many of the women who were in leadership positions in Cumann na mBan or the Citizen army during the Irish revolutionary period are already well known, there were hundreds if not thousands of other women – working class women, rural women, ordinary members of Cumann na mBan, whose contribution to the War of Independence, 1919-1921, was vital but often hidden. They were the intelligence gatherers, they were the spies and message carriers, they ran safe houses and took care of arms dumps, they transported arms and bomb making equipment to ambushes, they collected and buried the war dead, they were the essential backbone of the military operations. They were also the ones most in danger from the Crown Forces as they could not, usually, go on the run.

 

 

 

 

 

WILMOT: One of those women was a North Kerry woman, Amelia Wilmot (nee Canty), daughter of a blacksmith, born in 1874, in Lyracrompane, near Listowel, who is the subject of this lecture by Dr. Mary McAuliffe, assistant professor/lecturer in Gender Studies at UCD. Mary explores Amelia’s activism in the Irish War of Independence and her afterlife in the Irish Free State.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1w6b5185AlA&t=3s/

 

 

 ====================================================

 

Kerry's summer of violence in 1920

 

 

 

May 20 2020 06:30 AM

 

 

 

Kerry's summer of violence in 1920: APRIL

 

 

 

17 Apr - Constable Martin Clifford killed near Waterville.

 

 

 

18 Apr - Court House burned in Dingle.

 

 

 

21 Apr - Const. Patrick Foley, 25, of Annascaul kidnapped near home.

 

 

 

23 Apr - Const. Foley's body found at Deelis.

 

 

 

27 Apr. - Three RIC men held up in Annascaul. Constable Macpherson wounded.

 

 

 

30 Apr. - Military supplies burned in Dingle rail yard.

 

MAY

 

 

 

3 May - RIC Sgt Francis J. McKenna shot dead near Listowel.

 

 

 

4 May - RIC break windows in Tralee.

 

 

 

6 May - Fr. Curtayne, Ballybunion, threatened with death.

 

 

 

7 May - D.J. O'Sullivan, chairman of Tralee UDC, released from Wormwood Scrubbs after 14 days on hunger strike.

 

 

 

8 May - W. Mullins, Tralee; Mortimer O'Connor, O'dorney; and P. O'Shea released from Wormwood Scrubbs after 21 days on hunger strike.

 

 

 

10 May - Dan Healy, Tralee; and Alexander O'Donnell, Castlegregory, released from Wormwood Scrubbs after hunger strike.

 

 

 

14 May - Four cannons taken from Ross Castle by IRA.

 

 

 

15 May - Vacant RIC Barracks at Lixnaw burned.

 

 

 

16 May - Five men sentenced to death in Listowel unless they return money obtained in a bogus Republican collection.

 

 

 

23 May - Brandon Coast Guard station burned down.

 

 

 

25 May - Ballyheigue Coast Guard station burned down.

 

 

 

26 May - Attack on a Black-and-Tan contingent at Glenbeigh.

 

JUNE

 

 

 

2 June - Fenit RIC barracks attacked. Sgt. Murphy and Con. O'Regan wounded.

 

 

 

5 June - Newtownsandes (now Moyvane) Barracks burned. Military patrol attacked near Newtownsandes. Plan to burn Brosna RIC barracks foiled by military.

 

 

 

9 June - Fenit coast guard station attacked.

 

 

 

11 June - Army petrol consignment seized in Tralee.

 

 

 

18 June - Brosna barracks attacked.

 

 

 

19 June - Army attacked near Castleisland. Listowel mutiny.

 

 

 

28 June - RIC Constable Rael wounded in Ardfert.

 

JULY

 

 

 

11 July - IRA attack on Rathmore barracks,;Const. Alexander Will killed.

 

 

 

11 July - IRA attack RIC barracks in Farranfore,.

 

 

 

13 July - Consts Michael Lenihan, 34, and George Roche, 32, killed in ambush en route from Clochán to Dingle. D.I. Michael Fallon wounded.

 

 

 

16 July - Consts Cooney and Clear hurt in Glencar ambush.

 

 

 

20 July - Surprise attack from train in Tralee.

 

 

 

26 July - Two RIC constables wounded in Lixnaw.

 

AUGUST

 

 

 

2 Aug - Cloghane RIC barracks burned.

 

 

 

13 Aug - Two RIC hurt in IRA attack near Abbeydorney

 

 

 

14 Aug - Military stores burned at railway yard in Tralee.

 

 

 

14 Aug - Police burn printing works of Kerry News, Kerry Weekly Reporter and Killarney Echo in Russell Street, Tralee.

 

 

 

18 Aug - Military escort disarmed near Annascaul.

 

 

 

19 Aug - Paddy Kennedy of Annascaul killed.

 

 

 

28 Aug - IRA raids for shot guns in Cahirciveen.

 

 

 

For more see

 

https://www.independent.ie/regionals/kerryman/news/kerrys-summer-of-violence-in-1920-39218611.html

 

 

 

=================================================

 

 

 

 

 

The War of Independence in Kerry

 

Publisher 2 December, 2016 The Irish War of Independence

 

By Thomas Earls Fitzgerald

 

https://www.theirishstory.com/2016/12/02/the-war-of-independence-in-kerry/

 

Joseph Pronechen Blogs

 

October 1, 2020

 

When France entered into World War I in 1914, Thérèse of Lisieux had yet to be officially declared Blessed. She had died in 1897, but there she was among the French troops — fighting with them, protecting their lives and renewing their faith. After all, she admired Joan of Arc.

 

Soldiers flooded the Carmel in Lisieux with letters about their devotion to her. How she saved them. How she even appeared to them!

 

https://www.ncregister.com/blog/french-soldiers-tell-how-st-therese-helped-and-protected-them-in-world-war-i?utm_campaign=NCR%202019&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=96477149&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--jr5_Kd73dzPkJnVo7moNLfBn0pethoQtzZXpyUVB5Kn91bxpgcO6MF9P-_lz__JnsYi9DPf-7ffnyayaP670jICXHgQ&utm_content=96477149&utm_source=hs_email

 

Abbeyfeale County Limerick

Healy/Harnett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick Harnett was a young postman and he lived with his parents at Bridge Street, Abbeyfeale. His friend, Jeremiah Healy, was an apprentice blacksmith at Batt Begley’s forge, next door to the Harnetts.

 

 

 

It was September 1920, a time of great unrest in the area. There had been an ambush at Mountmahon where a constable was shot dead and the Black & Tans were seeking revenge.

 

 

 

On September 20th. at six in the evening, Patrick and Jeremiah went for a walk out the road we now know as Killarney Road. According to The Farmer Harnett they were going to see a horse that was lying dead on the inch, having been shot. As they left Bridge Street they were being observed by a Black & Tan named Thomas Huckerby who was standing at the barrack door, across the street from the Harnett household. Huckerby, with a pistol strapped to his thigh, followed the two men and a short time later shot them both dead. A memorial marks the spot beside Mulcahy’s Garage on the Killarney Road. Following their funerals in the parish church they were laid to rest side by side in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further information:  James Harnett  0872500929

 

Names of police officers whose details are contained in the

 

Roll of Honour at the National Police Memorial

 

For IRELAND http://www.policerollofhonour.org.uk/memorial/memorial_trust/npm_roll_ireland.htm

 

 

 

1920- Patrick Foley-Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- Martin Clifford-Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- Alexander Will-Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- John Stokes- Sergeant, RIC, Co. Tipperary

 

1920- Michael Lenihan- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- George Roche- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- William Madden- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- George Morgan- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- Philip St John Howlett Kelleher- District Inspector, RIC, Co. Longford

 

1920- Ernest Bright- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- Albert F. Caseley- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- Herbert John Evans- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- Patrick Waters-Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1920- Robert Gorbey-Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- Tobias O`Sullivan- District Inspector , RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921- George Horace Howlett- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- Patrick Roche- Constable, RIC (Retd.), Co. Kerry.

 

1921-Walter V. Falkiner MC- Cadet, ADRIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921-John Grant- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921-John Alister Mackinnon- Commander, ADRIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921- William E. Clapp- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- Robert Dyne- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- Alfred Hillyer- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- Samuel H. Watkins- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921-Hedley D. Woodcock- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- Walter Thomas Brown- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- James Phelan- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- William K. Storey-Head Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921-Thomas McCormack- Sergeant, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921- Francis Benson-Head Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921- Charles F. Mead- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921- James Christopher Collery-Sergeant, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- Joseph Cooney- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921-Michael Francis McCaughey- District Inspector, RIC, Co. Kerry

 

1921- John Quirk-Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921- John S. McCormack- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921- James Kane- Sergeant, RIC (Retd.), Co. Kerry.

 

1921- James Butler- Sergeant, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1921- John Maher-Sergeant, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

1922- Charles F. Ednie- Constable, RIC, Co. Kerry.

 

=========================================

 

Sub-Const Patrick Cleary-Died 8 November 1828

 

Killed on duty in an affray in Co. Down.

 

http://www.policerollofhonour.org.uk/forces/ireland_to_1922/ric/irish_constabularies_roll_1800-1836.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lead Up to the Mutiny

 

 

 

The Listowel RIC Mutiny had all the ingredients of high drama.  It was triggered off by the visit of ex-war hero, Colonel Gerald Bryce Ferguson Smyth, Divisional Police Commissioner for Munster. However, the situation had been building up for some days.

 

 

 

On the night of 16th June 1920, RIC constables in Listowel received orders to hand over their barracks to the British military effective at noon the next day. They also received orders that they were nearly all re-assigned to other stations in Kerry to act as scouts for the military. Three sergeants and one constable were to stay in Listowel as scouts.  None of the men were from the area, because the RIC always stationed men away from whence they came; but these men had acquired valuable local knowledge from their duties and experience in the area.

 

 

 

The constables held a meeting and decided unanimously not to obey these orders. They saw that they were going to be used in a war against their own people. They reasoned that whatever the outcome, the British soldiers could go home; but the constables would have to live in Ireland with the consequences of their actions. They even considered the possibility that they may have to resist by force. They figured there were enough bombs, rifles, and revolvers there to hold out at least a few days.

 

 

 

They telephoned the County Inspector in Tralee at 9pm and told him they were refusing to leave their barracks. There was no immediate response, but District Inspector Thomas Flanagan later got orders by phone from County Inspector Poer O’Shea to have the constables assemble at 10am the next day.

 

 

 

County Inspector O’Shea arrived at 10am on the 17th to address the men.  He chastised them and advised them about the seriousness of their refusal to obey these orders. He told them the military were required to be installed in the barracks at noon and that this applied to all headquarters in the Province of Munster. O’Shea demanded: “Do you refuse to obey the order of the Divisional Commissioner, an order that applies to all Munster, and bring discredit on the Police force?”

 

 

 

Thirty-one year old Constable Jeremiah Mee from Glenamaddy, Co. Galway; whom the constables had chosen as their spokesman, affirmed his refusal.  O’Shea advised him that he should resign. Mee offered his resignation immediately. O’Shea asked if anyone else was prepared to resign. Thirteen other constables each stated “I resign” in turn.

 

https://www.kerrywritersmuseum.com/listowelpolicemutiny/

 

So far we have identified 418 soldiers of the National Army who died during the Civil War:

 

  320 were killed in action or died as a result of wounds received in action.

 

  98 died as a result of accidents or illness attributable to service.

 

http://www.irishmedals.ie/National-Army-Killed.php

 

 

 

30/06/1922

 

On Friday morning the 30th of June 1922 a soldier of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces was killed when Anti Treaty troops opened fire on shops and a hotel in Tralee County Kerry where Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces troops were billeted, the dead soldier was,   Edward Michael Sheehy, 21 years old and a native of Tralee. He was employed as an egg packer before joining the national Army and had served with the IRA during the War of Independence. He was from Listowel County Kerry

 

05/08/1922

 

 

 

On the 5th of August 1922 a National Army soldier was shot dead at Ballymacthomas in County Kerry, the soldier had only joined the National Army the day before. He was married with two sons a daughter and a stepdaughter. He served with the British Army during WW1 as a Private in the Leinster Regiment, service number 5667.

 

    Private Michael Purcell a native of Tralee County Kerry.

 

 

 

19/08/1922

 

A soldier of the National Army was killed in an ambush when a party of Troops marching near Listowel County Kerry on Friday the 19th of August 1922.

 

  Private John Quane a native of Meleek County Clare.

 

 

 

09/09/1922

 

On Saturday the 9th of September 1922 brothers John and Thomas O’Connor were killed in action in Kenmare, County Kerry during a fierce battle as several hundred Anti-Treaty Irregulars took over the town. The two brother, both officers in the National Army, were killed in an attack on their home. Both brothers were asleep when the house was raided at about 6am.

 

 Brigadier Thomas O’Connor, 2nd Kerry Brigade, Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces. He was born on the 3rd of March 1902. He served throughout the War of independence.

 

    Captain John O’Connor, 2nd Kerry Brigade, Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces. He was born on the 1st of June 1896. He served with the I.R.A. throughout the War of Independence.

 

13/10/1922

 

 

 

On Friday the 13th of October 1922 a soldier of the National Army was shot dead by an Anti Treaty sniper while on sentry duty at Abbeydorney County Kerry. The dead soldier was,

 

 

 

    Timothy Goggin, aged 22 and from Abbeydorney County Kerry.

 

 

 

27/10/1922

 

On Friday the 27th of October 1922 a soldier of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces was killed in an exchange of fire with Anti Treaty Forces at Tonevane near Castlegregory County Kerry. He was,

 

 Private Nagle, a native of Killarney serving with the 1st Western Brigade.

 

25/01/1923

 

On Thursday the 25th of January 1923 while travelling to from Barracks to Caherciveen Town, Count Kerry, a group of unarmed soldiers of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces were ambushed resulting in the death of one National Army soldier, he was,   Private Patrick Roche from Waterville County Kerry and a member of the Kerry Brigade.

 

 

 

10/02/1923

 

On Saturday the 10th of February 1923 a soldier of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces was shot when ambushed near Scarthaglin Village County Kerry. The dead soldier was:

 

  Lieutenant G Slattery, Kerry Number 1 brigade.

 

05/03/1923

 

 

 

On Monday the 5th of March 1923 while engaged in an operation to clear Anti Treaty Troops from Gurrane Hill Caherciveen County Kerry 3 soldier of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces were killed in the operation. The 3 soldiers were:

 

   Lieutenant Timothy O’Shea from Caherciveen. He was employed as a Shoemaker before joining the National Army.

 

    Sergeant Jeremiah Quane, service number 7732, he was a native of Ardfert County Kerry. He was employed as a postman before joining the National Army. He was born on the 11th of December 1896. He joined the National Army in February or March 1922 having arrived in Dublin’s Beggars Bush Barracks with a group of men from the Ardfert district who all joined the National Army.

 

    Private William Healy, service number 7765. He was from Valentia, County Kerry. He was born in 1904 and had joined the National Army in September 1922. He was employed on the family farm before joining the National Army.

 

06/03/1923

 

 

 

On Tuesday the 6th of March 5 soldiers of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces were killed in a mine explosion in Koncknagoshel County Kerry. The soldiers went to investigate an arms dump in Baranarig Woods, the arms dump contained a landmine wired to a trip-wire which exploded when the soldiers approached the arms dump.

 

 

 

The soldiers killed were:

 

  Captain Michael Dunne, 14401 Dublin Guards, Óglaigh na hÉireann. He was from Dublin. He had been a member of the Irish Volunteers and the I.R.A. and fought during the War of Independence. Before joining the National Army he was employed as a Fitter with the Tramway Company, Ballsbridge, Dublin.

 

    Captain Edward Stapleton, 14096, C Company, 19th Infantry Battalion, Óglaigh na hÉireann.

 

    Lieutenant Patrick O’Connor, 50697, C Company, 19th Infantry Battalion, Óglaigh na hÉireann. He worked on his father’s farm before joining the National Army. He was a native of Knockaneatee, Castleisland, County Kerry. His father was kidnapped and threatened with death and had cattle stolen and the sum of £50 extorted from him by Anti-treat Irregulars.

 

    Private Michael Galvin from Killarney.

 

    Private Laurence O'Connor, Causeway, County Kerry. Army number 49515, Óglaigh na hÉireann.

 

12/03/1923

 

On Monday the 12th of March 1923 an officer of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces was killed in a tragic accident, while returning from an out-post at Finuge to Listowel County Kerry, Lieutenant A Glynn and Captain Cleary experimented with a bomb by throwing it into the river Feale. The bomb exploded with great force and Lieutenant Glynn was killed instantly. Captain Cleary was seriously wounded and died later that day, Cleary was a native of whitegate and a prominent member of the East Clare Brigade during the War of Independence. Lieutenant Glynn was the son of Mr J H Glynn Commercial Hotel Gort County Galway.

 

25/03/1923

 

On the 25th of March 1923 Private Hayes of Óglaigh na hÉireann/National Forces was accidently shot dead when challenged by a sentry at Newtownsandes County Kerry. Hayes was a native of Killarney County Kerry.

 

21/04/1923

 

On Saturday the 21st of April 1923 a soldier of the National Army, Stephen Canty a native of Causeway County Kerry, was shot dead when on duty in the town of Ennis County Clare. He was on patrol and when passing through Carmody Street shots were fired at the patrol, Clancy was shot through the head and died instantly. He was 21 years old and had worked as a labourer before joining the National Army.

 

http://www.irishmedals.ie/National-Army-Killed.php

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paddy Griffin was born on 4 August 1894 at 139 North King Street in Dublin’s North West inner city. His father, also named Patrick, worked as a Labourer in a local brewery but died when Paddy was 11 years old in 1906 leaving his mother Mary to raise seven children. Four of them would later die of TB.

 

https://www.customhousecommemoration.com/2018/03/18/who-was-specky-griffin-custom-house-burning/

 

#OTD in 1921 – Sir Arthur Vicars was assassinated in Kilmorna, Co Kerry by the IRA.

 

 

 

Sir Arthur Vicars is executed by the IRA in Co Kerry and around his neck the IRA placed a placard bearing the inscription ‘SPY. INFORMERS BEWARE. IRA NEVER FORGETS’. Vicars, who played a pivotal (and probably negligent) role in the theft of the Irish Crown Jewels in 1907. Born in England, Vicars spent most of his life in Ireland where he was Custodian of the Irish Crown Jewels at the time they were stolen. Vicars was dismissed from his post as a result. The jewels were the insignia of the Illustrious Order of St Patrick, instituted in 1783 as the Irish equivalent of the Order of the Garter. The star and badge, made in the royal insignia and decorated with Brazilian rubies, emeralds and diamonds, were a gift to the Order of St Patrick from King William IV in 1831. Legend has it, the Irish Crown Jewels may have been sold to a Dutch pawnbroker, or to private collectors, or buried outside Dublin or even (according to an official document) offered for sale to the Irish Free State in 1927. To this day their whereabouts is unknown.

 

 

 

Read more | https://stairnaheireann.net/?p=53714

 

ARMY Search Canada

 

Title       Letters from the front : being a record of the part played by officers of the bank in the Great War, 1914-1919. Vol. 2- Date        1920- Publisher Canadian Bank of Commerce

 

Leslie, Thomas Edward—Private. Born 5th May, 1893, at Cahirciveen, County Kerry, Ireland. Father, Thomas J. Leslie (deceased). Educated at Kilkenny College, and Galway Grammar School. Entered the service of the Bank, 14th March, 1913. Enlisted, 12th January, 1918, from Gilbert Plains branch, in 1st Depot Battalion, Manitoba Regiment, with the rank of Private. Transferred to llth Canadian Reserve Battalion, February, 1918. Service: Trained as a Signaller in Canada and England. Returned to duty with the Bank, 25th July, 1919.

 

 

 

 

 

Title       Letters from the front : being a record of the part played by officers of the bank in the Great War, 1914-1919. Vol. 2- Date        1920- Publisher Canadian Bank of Commerce

 

Clery, William Valentine Patrick—Lieutenant. Born 14th February, 1892, at Bantry, County Cork, Ireland. Father, P. F. Clery, Bank Manager. Educated at St. Michael's College, Listowel, Ireland, and Skerry's College, Dublin. Entered the service of the Bank, 26th April, 1911. Enlisted, 30th June, 1915, from First Street West, Calgary, branch, in 50th Canadian Battalion, with the rank of Lieutenant. Transferred to 16th Battalion (The Canadian Scottish), June, 1916. Principal actions: Ypres, Somme, 1916; Cambrai, 1918. Wounded (gun shot), 26th September, 1916. Demobilized, 3rd May, 1919. Returned to duty with the Bank 6th May, 1919.

 

http://contentdm.ucalgary.ca/digital/collection/cmh/id/25601

 

 

 

 

 

Title       Letters from the front: being a record of the part played by officers of the bank in the Great War, 1914-1919. Vol. 2 -Date        1920- Publisher Canadian Bank of Commerce

 

Digital Publisher University of Calgary

 

280    LETTERS FROM THE FRONT

 

Maginn, Francis John—Lieutenant, D.S.O. Born 12th May, 1892, at Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland. Father, John Maginn, Manager, Bank of Ireland, Ballina, Ireland (retired). Educated at King William's College, Isle of Man. Entered the service of the Bank, 23rd March, 1912. Enlisted, June, 1915, from Marcelin branch, in 65th Canadian Battalion, with the rank of Private. Transferred to 75th Canadian Battalion, May, 1916; London Irish Rifles, June, 1917; London Rifle Brigade, December, 1917. Promoted Corporal, November, 1915; Second Lieutenant, June, 1917; Lieutenant, December, 1918. Principal actions: Somme, 1916; Cambrai, 1917; German Attack on Arras, March, 1918.

 

Appointed A Companion of The Distinguished Service Order "For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When an officer of another regiment was very severely wounded and was unable to move, he rushed forward with two stretcher-bearers under heavy machine-gun and sniper's fire and sniped the enemy  for fifteen minutes, covering  the   stretcher-bearers, who   were thus able to bring the wounded officer back.    He showed splendid courage and resource." (Supplement to the London Gazette, 5th July, 1918). Mentioned In Despatches For Gallant and Distinguished Service in the Field.

 

Severely wounded (shrapnel) in the thigh, Somme, 1916; slightly wounded (shrapnel) in the head, Cambrai, 1917.     Invalided home. May, 1918, with trench fever.

 

http://contentdm.ucalgary.ca/digital/collection/cmh/id/25807/rec/1

 

 

 

LETTERS FROM THE FRONT

 

Foley, Ernest George—Corporal. Born 8th July, 1893, at Limerick, Ireland. Father, The Rev. Archdeacon Foley, B.D., Clerk in Holy Orders. Educated at Avoca School, Dublin, Ireland. Entered the service of the Bank, 29th September, 1913. Enlisted, June, 1915, from Melville branch, in 45th Canadian Battalion, with the rank of Private. Transferred to 29th Canadian Battalion, April, 1916. Promoted Lance-Corporal, September, 1915; Corporal, March, 1916. Principal actions: St. Eloi, Ypres, 1916. Wounded (five compound fractures), 26th June, 1916. Demobilized, January, 1917, on account of being medically unfit for further military service, owing to amputation of the left leg at thigh. Subsequent occupation: Cashier in shipping firm's office, January, 1917.

 

 

 

McCarthy, Charles Leopold Joseph—Captain. Born 14th June, 1893, at Sligo, Ireland. Father, Jeremiah McCarthy, Solicitor. Educated at Mungret College, Limerick, and National University of Ireland (Matriculation). Entered the service of the Bank, 21st March, 1911. Enhsted, 20th January, 1915, from Shaunavon branch, in 46th Canadian Battalion, with the rank of Private. Transferred to Connaught Rangers, 12th August, 1915; attached to the Indian Army, 7th October, 1917. Promoted Second Lieutenant, 12th August, 1915; Lieutenant, 12th May, 1917; Captain, 4th November, 1918. Service: General Infantry engagements in France and Belgium, September, 1916, to March, 1917; in India, November, 1917, to May, 1918; in Mesopotamia, June to December, 1918.

 

Awarded

 

A Parchment Certificate for Gallantry in the Field (Flanders, 1916).

 

Returned to duty with the Bank, 2nd October, 1919.    Retired from

 

the service of the Bank, 30th September,  1920, on account of ill health.

 

http://contentdm.ucalgary.ca/digital/collection/cmh/id/25853

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IRELAND IN   THE LAST  FIFTY   YEARS (1866-1916)

 

be got out of the way until the claims of Irish nationality are recognised," and

 

such recognition means " an Irish Parliament and an Irish Executive for the management of Irish affairs."Perhaps one may say that the Irish question, as it has shown itself through the centuries, goes even deeper than politics and economics. It is the result of a clash of two ways of life. England

 

early evolved the conception of the State. We may even say that England was the first heir of Rome, among modern nations, in the transmission of that conception. But it is a conception which under most of its forms—and there have been several—has failed to square with the tribal conception so long maintained by the Irish. The feudal form of the Middle Ages did not satisfy mediaeval Ireland. The administrative form of the Tudors and Stuarts did not satisfy the Ireland of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The parliamentary form of the eighteenth century was very far from satisfying eighteenth century Ireland. We have still to see—and here there is far more (Break)

 

Title       Ireland in the last fifty years (1866-1916)

 

Creator Barker, Ernest, Sir, 1874-1960. Author Date 1916

 

Description         A 190 page book created in Britain as a tool for education during World War I regarding the history of Ireland. Inscription -The number 5592, written in pencil, upper right-hand side of title page

 

http://contentdm.ucalgary.ca/digital/collection/cmh/id/159522/rec/29

 

Feb 2020

ADVANCE NOTICE OF COMMEMORATION:  Patrick Harnett was a young postman and he lived with his parents at Bridge Street, Abbeyfeale. His friend, Jeremiah Healy, was an apprentice blacksmith at Batt Begley’s forge, next door to the Harnetts.

It was September 1920, a time of great unrest in the area. There had been an ambush at Mountmahon where a constable was shot dead and the Black & Tans were seeking revenge.

On September 20th. at six in the evening, Patrick and Jeremiah went for a walk out the road we now know as Killarney Road. According to The Farmer Harnett they were going to see a horse that was lying dead on the inch, having been shot. As they left Bridge Street they were being observed by a Black & Tan named Thomas Huckerbery who was standing at the barrack door, across the street from the Harnett household. Huckerbery, with a pistol strapped to his thigh, followed the two men and a short time later shot them both dead. A memorial marks the spot beside Mulcahy’s Garage on the Killarney Road. Following their funerals in the parish church they were laid to rest side by side in St. Mary’s Cemetery, ninety years ago.

They were two innocent, unarmed men who had no political involvement whatsoever. Yet, by their deaths they became a part of the struggle for Irish independence. Their deaths link the town of Abbeyfeale, the people of Abbeyfeale and especially their families to the birth of our nation.  Sunday September 20th. 2020, 6.05 p.m. will mark the exact centenary, to the minute, of the assassinations. A commemoration will take place at that time. Full details will be announced nearer the time, but we especially ask all Healys and Harnetts  to circulate this advance notice among family and friends. 

REVEALED: The fifth Kerry man to die during the Easter Rising

 

Nov 15, 2016

 

Duagh native and UCD historian Dr Mary McAuliffe will give a talk at 8pm on Thursday, November 24th in Duagh national school hall on Robert Dillon, from Lyreacrompane, who has now become known as the ‘Fifth Kerryman’ killed during the Easter Rising.

 

 

 

Dr McAuliffe – one of the co-editors of ‘Kerry 1916: Histories and Legacies of the Easter Rising – has researched the story of the north Kerry native who was a successful businessman in Dublin’s Moore Street. He died tragically while trying to get his family to safety during the worst fighting of the Rising. Witnessing Dillon’s death on Moore Street, Pádraig Pearse is said to have finally decided to surrender to prevent further civilian casualties. Robert Dillon’s name is now on the list of the Rising dead in Glasnevin Cemetery. His descendants are the Dillon family in the parish.

 

 

 

Dr McAuliffe will also talk on the other north Kerry men and women who took part in the Rising and who were active during the Revolutionary Years. Poet and Ballylongford native Brendan Kennelly will give a poetry reading and there will also be a musical interlude with a 1916 theme.

 

 

 

This event is a fundraiser for the local Transition Year students who are travelling with the Hope Foundation to Kolkata and entry is €5 per family. The book on the period, Kerry 1916: Histories and Legacies of the Easter Rising – A Centenary Record will be for sale at a special price on the night. All are welcome.

 

 

 

NOTE: The full story of Robert Dillon will be published on this website shortly. Follow us on Twitter @kerry1916book for updates.

 

 

 

 

 

The Irish at War

 

@irelandbattles

 

Feb 5

 

#OnThisDay 1922 Cumann na mBan held a convention & voted 419 against to 63 for the Treaty. Countess Markievicz was elected President & the pro-Treaty members were asked to resign. They formed their own group called Cumann na Saoirse led by Jennie Wyse Power.

 

 

 

1916 Items;  https://www.rcpi.ie/heritage-centre/1916-2/revolutionary-diary-kathleen-lynn/

 

DEV: According to Kennedy aides Kenneth O’Donnell and David Powers in their book ‘Johnny, we hardly knew ye’, de Valera responded that ‘he had lived in Ireland since his early childhood, but he was born in New York City, and because of his American citizenship, the British were reluctant to kill him. “But there were many times when the key in my jail cell door was turned”, he said, “and I thought that my turn had come”.’ O’Donnell and Powers report that Kennedy was ‘spellbound’ as he listened to the aging rebel’s tale, with its emphasis on de Valera’s American connection.

 

https://www.historyireland.com/20th-century-contemporary-history/ambiguous-reprieve-dev-and-america/

 

 

 

23 July 1946, New York Times; The Rev. Thomas J. Wheelwright, half-brother of Prime Minister Eamon de Valera of Eire and superior of St. Alphonsus Retreat House, Tobyhanna, Pa., died yesterday in Mercy Hospital, Scranton, Pa., it was announced here by the Redemptorist Order, of which Father Wheelwright was a member. He was 55 years old.

 

https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1946/07/23/96935646.html

 

 

 

 

 

They are not ‘hanging men and women for the wearing of the green’ these days,” an American newspaper commented on May 13, 1916, of events recently transpired in Dublin; “they are shooting them.” That terse opinion was expressed in the pages of the Sacred Heart Review, published weekly in Cambridge, Massachusetts, but with a readership, largely Irish Catholic, throughout the United States.

 

http://bcm.bc.edu/index.html%3Fp=5213.html

 

 

 

Paddy Waldron

 

6 Jan 2020

 

Cathal Crowe, the Mayor of Clare and a candidate for the imminent general election, has raised some interesting questions by announcing a boycott of an event on 17 January to commemorate those who served in the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) and the Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP).

 

 

 

What do our monuments and commemorations call to rememberance? Of what do they preserve the memory? Do they preserve good memories for all, bad memories for all, or good memories for some and bad memories for others? Are they concerned with events, dates, individuals, institutions or organisations? Should we commemorate wars themselves, or the end of wars?

 

 

 

There are many monuments that already preserve the memory of the RIC. I pass two on a regular basis - Mark Kelly's mural outside the Museum of Irish Rural Life at the Old Creamery in Kilrush, depicting RIC men at an eviction during the Land War in 1888; and the monument on the bridge between Ballina and Killaloe to the Scarriff Martyrs, four men killed by the Auxiliary Division of the RIC and the Black and Tans in November 1920.

 

 

 

The Royal Irish Constabulary was disbanded on 30 August 1922, so 30 August 2022 would be an appropriate and neutral date for a centenary commemoration.

 

 

 

I have always had mixed feelings about the RIC. My greatgrandfather and greatgreatgrandfather, both named Thomas Waldron, were members of the organisation from 1847 (when it was still the plain Irish Constabulary) to 1898. I remember my cousin Tomás de Bhaldraithe explaining, when asked about his ancestors, "Bhí muid i seirbhís an namhaid" ("We were in the service of the enemy"). I remember my greatuncle Des Waldron lamenting when his grandson followed his father into the Garda Síochána that he was the only break in a five generation tradition of police service. I later discovered that this tradition went back two generations further to John Keas, who was regularly appointed between 1815 and at least 1837 as High Constable of the Barony of Pubblebrien, a local office soon replaced by the new Irish Constabulary; John Keas's granddaughter married the older Thomas Waldron in 1851.

 

 

 

In 1907, my grandfather's first cousin Bill Glennon (RIC registered number 62442, joined 18 March 1907) and my grandmother's first cousin George Roche (RIC registered number 62449) joined the organisation at around the same time. They may therefore have known each other during their initial training, and may have been aware that their respective first cousins married each other the following year. Bill and George both met violent deaths, at the hands of different enemies, while serving the crown: Bill at the Battle of the Somme on 12 October 1916 after transferring to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers; George in an ambush at Cloghane/Dingle, County Kerry during the War of Independence on 13 July 1920 while still serving with the RIC. I know that some of George Roche's relatives are wondering how best to commemorate the centenary of his death this coming summer, but I don't know how to answer that question.

 

CANADA: Participate in the Indexing of the

 

Canadian World War I Personal Records

 

During the last indexing week, you were almost 2,000 participants and you have indexed more than 200,000 records.

 

To mark the Armistice of 11 November 1918, we propose to participate in the indexing of Canadian World War I personal records, from November 8, 2019 until November 17, 2019.

 

 

 

Over 600,000 men and women enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) during the First World War (1914-1918) as soldiers, nurses and chaplains.

 

 

 

To participate, go to the menu "Projects" and "Collaborative indexing", select the collection "Canadian World War I personal records" and the time you can spend on it, then click the button "Start indexing".

 

Daniel Rudd- Calling a Church to Justice

 

by Gary B. Agee

 

 

 

In May of 1890, the Christian Soldier, an African American newspaper, identified the Catholic journalist and activist Daniel Arthur Rudd as the "greatest negro Catholic in America." Yet many Catholics today are unaware of Rudd's efforts to bring about positive social change during the early decades of the Jim Crow era. In Daniel Rudd: Calling a Church to Justice, Gary Agee offers a compelling look at the life and work of this visionary who found inspiration in his Catholic faith to fight for the principles of liberty and justice. Born into slavery, Rudd achieved success early on as the publisher of the American Catholic Tribune, one of the most successful black newspapers of its era, and as the founder of the National Black Catholic Congress.

 

More on Belfast

 

https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/belfast-pogrom-book.amp

 

 

 

 

SOME IRISH HISTORY: In the face of intimidation of Cumann na nGaedheal meetings by the anti-treaty IRA and the rise in support for Éamon de Valera’s Fianna Fáil from 1926, a new strategy was required to strengthen the voice of the pro-Treaty tradition who now found themselves in opposition. The National Guard, popularly known as the Blueshirts, and originally the Army Comrades Association, a nationalist-conservative and covertly fascist movement led by Eoin O’Duffy, took up the task of defending Cumann na nGaedheal rallies from republican intimidation. When they planned a march on Dublin, de Valera banned the demonstration, fearing a repeat of Mussolini’s infamous March on Rome. As a result, Fine Gael–The United Ireland Party was founded as an independent party on 8 September 1933, following a merger of Cumann na nGaedheal, the National Centre Party and the National Guard. The merger brought together two strands of Irish nationalism namely the pro-treaty wing of revolutionary Sinn Féin and the old Home Rule party represented by Dillon and the Centre Party. In reality, the new party was a larger version of Cumann na nGaedheal, the party created in 1923 by the Pro-Treaty leaders of the Irish Free State under W. T. Cosgrave.

 

 

 

https://wordpress.com/read/blogs/58539435/posts/46659

 

 

 

 

 

Oct 2, 2019

 

  Pearse KellyPensionsSean McCaugheyStephen Hayes

 

The Military Archives have released their most recent set of pension files today including documents shedding light on the activities of the IRA, Cumann na mBan and Fianna Éireann. While they primarily relate to the years 1916 to 1923, there is a wealth of information buried within them relating to later periods of equally significant historical value. Here is one example to get started with.

 

https://wordpress.com/read/blogs/60634191/posts/4698

 

 

 

Pension Files

 

https://treasonfelony.wordpress.com/2019/09/25/belfast-brigade-ira-files-new-release-by-mspc/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Address from the Army Council of the Irish Republican Army to the Men and Women of the Orange Order

 

https://treasonfelony.wordpress.com/2017/07/10/ira-appeal-to-the-orange-order/

 

[This is the text as quoted by The Kerryman on 16th July 1932. It was published in An Phoblacht the same day and had been largely written by Peader O’Donnell. Prior to publication, it had been circulated with a covering letter from the IRA’s Adjutant General, Donal O’Donoghue, on 8th July to newspaper editors. Most, even including the Belfast Newsletter, published abridged versions as early as 11th July 1932. I have kept the formatting here from The Kerryman version. The address was distributed as leaflets in unionist districts of Belfast by IRA volunteers.]

 

North Kerry Word press

 

https://northkerry.wordpress.com/

 

‘Pray for me’: The last letter of an RIC officer executed by the IRA

 

Ronan McGreevy

 

 

 

The poignant last letter of former Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) officer who was executed by the IRA for being a spy has been released as part of the Brigade Activity Reports.

 

James Kane, a fisheries protection officer in Co Kerry, was executed on June 16th 1921 on suspicion that he gave his former RIC colleagues details of eight IRA men who were  involved in the shooting dead of the constabulary’s divisional commander.

 

Detective Inspector Tobias O’Sullivan was shot dead on January 20th, 1921 outside Listowel barracks in Co Kerry. Some time later men from the 6th Battalion, Kerry North Brigade, kidnapped Kane. They did so on instruction from IRA General Headquarters (GHQ) and interrogated him.

 

After a prolonged period of interrogation he was executed on June 16th, 1921. His body was left by the side of the road with a note, “Convicted spy. Let others beware. IRA.”

 

Before he died Kane composed a letter to his family which is in the newly-released Brigade Activity Reports files of 1 Kerry Brigade. The letter is addressed to his children, one of whom is said to have cried out as the coffin was lowered into the ground, “Daddy, daddy”.

 

It beings: “My dear children, I am condemned (to) die. I had the priest today, thank God. I give you all my blessing and pray God may protect you all. Pray for me and get some masses said for me.”

 

Kane goes on to list the financial provisions he has made for the family and the money he owes to people locally.

 

It is clear that his children will be left as orphans as he requests that he be buried next to his “loving wife if possible”.

 

He concluded: “Don’t go to too much expense at the funeral and have no drink or public wake. I am told my body will be got near home. I got the greatest kindness from those in charge of men.

 

“Good bye now and God bless you and God bless Ireland. Pray for us constantly and give my love to all my friends and neighbours and thank them for all their kindness.”

 

 

 

The Valley of Knockanure

 

 

 

You may sing and speak about Easter week and the heroes of ninety eight.

 

Of Fenian men who roamed the glen in victory or defeat,

 

Of those who died on the scaffold high or outlawed on the moor,

 

But no word was said of our gallant dead in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

There was Padraic Dalton and Padraic Walsh they were known both far and wide,

 

In every house in every town they were always side by side,

 

A Republic bold they did uphold though outlawed on the moor,

 

And side by side they bravely died in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

In Gortaglanna’s lovely glen these gallant men took shade ,

 

While in young wheat both soft and sweet the summer breezes played,

 

It was not long ‘till Lyons came on saying time is not mine ‘nor yours,

 

But alas it was late and they met their fate in the valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

It was from a neighbouring hillside we listened in calm dismay,

 

In every house, in every town a maiden knelt to pray,

 

They are closing in around them now with rifle shot so sure,

 

And Walsh is dead and Lyons is down in the valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

They took them hence behind the fence wherein the furze did bloom,

 

Like brothers so they faced their foe to meet their vengeful doom,

 

When Dalton spoke his voice it broke with a passion proud and pure,

 

For our land we’ll die as we face the sky in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

And there they lay on the cold cold clay they were martyred for Ireland’s cause,

 

While the cowardly clan of the Black and Tan it showed them England’s laws,

 

No more they’ll feel the soft breeze steal o’er the uplands so secure,

 

For the wild geese fly where our hero’s lie in the valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

I met with Dalton’s mother and she to me did say,

 

May God be with my darling son who died in the glen today,

 

If I could kiss his cold clay lips my aching heart ‘twould cure,

 

And I’d gladly lay him down to sleep in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

The golden sun it is sinking down behind the Feale and lea,

 

And a pale, pale moon is rising there far out beyond Tralee,

 

A twinkling star through clouds afar shone down o’er Cullen’s moor,

 

And the Banshee cried when Dalton died in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

Dalton Walsh and Lyons brave, although your hearts are clay,

 

Yet in your stead be true men yet who will take your place today,

 

While grass is found on Irelands ground your memory will endure,

 

So God guard and keep the place you sleep in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/easterrising/songs/rs_song08.shtml

 

   

Subject: Re. North Kerry World War 1 Dead.

 

 

 

 Hi. Jim.

 

It was with interest I read the piece on the memory of those killed from North Kerry while serving with various Countries in World War 1.  My uncle Daniel J Culhane, Leitrim East, Moyvane was one of those brave young men who gave his life in that war. He left Moyvane in his teens for America and

 

was drafted  into the U.S Army 210th Infantry, 78th Division. He was killed in action on Oct, 25th 1918 in the Argonne Forest, France. He was  23 yrs old. I have photos and cuttings from U.S newspapers about him as he was only married a couple of months, and was dead for 9 months

 

before his wife was informed.

 

 

 

Sincerely John Culhane

 

(Ballyduff)

 

 

 

 

THE VALLEY OF KNOCKANURE

 

 

 

    In memory of Jeremiah Lyons, Patrick Dalton and Patrick Walsh, murdered by Crown Forces

 

    at Gortagleanna, Co. Kerry on 12th May, 1921.

 

 

 

    You may sing and speak about Easter Week or the heroes of Ninety-Eight,

 

    Of the Fenian men who roamed the glen in victory or defeat,

 

    Their names are placed on history’s page, their memory will endure,

 

    Not a song is sung for our darling sons in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

    Our hero boys they were bold and true, no counsel would they take,

 

    They rambled to a lonely spot where the Black and Tans did wait,

 

    The Republic bold they did uphold though outlawed on the moor,

 

    And side by side they bravely died in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

    There was Walsh and Lyons and Dalton, boys, they were young and in their pride,

 

    In every house in every town they were always side by side,

 

    The Republic bold they did uphold though outlawed on the moor,

 

    And side by side they bravely died in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

    In Gortagleanna’s lovely glen, three gallant men took shade,

 

    While in young wheat, full, soft and sweet the summer breezes played,

 

    But ’twas not long till Lyons came on, saying “Time’s not mine nor your”,

 

    But alas ’twas late and they met their fate in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

    They took them then beside a fence to where the furze did bloom,

 

    Like brothers so they faced the foe for to meet their dreadful doom,

 

    When Dalton spoke his voice it broke with a passion proud and pure,

 

    “For our land we die as we face the sky in the Valley of Knockanure.”

 

 

 

    ‘Twas on a neighbouring hillside we listened in calm dismay,

 

    In every house in every town a maiden knelt to pray,

 

    They’re closing in around them now with rifle fire so sure,

 

    And Dalton’s dead and Lyons is down in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

    But ere the guns could seal his fate Con Dee had broken through,

 

    With a prayer to God he spurned the sod and against the hill he flew,

 

    The bullets tore his flesh in two, yet he cried with passion pure,

 

    “For my comrades’ death, revenge I’ll get, in the Valley of Knockanure.”

 

 

 

    There they lay on the hillside clay for the love of Ireland’s cause,

 

    Where the cowardly clan of the Black and Tan had showed them England’s laws,

 

    No more they’ll feel the soft winds steal o’er uplands fair and sure,

 

    For side by side our heroes died in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

    I met with Dalton’s mother and she to me did say,

 

    “May God have mercy on his soul who fell in the glen today,

 

    Could I but kiss his cold, cold lips, my aching heart ‘twould cure,

 

    And I’d gladly lay him down to rest in the Valley of Knockanure.”

 

 

 

    The golden sun is setting now behind the Feale and Lee,

 

    The pale, pale moon is rising far out beyond Tralee,

 

    The dismal stars and clouds afar are darkened o’er the moor,

 

    And the banshee cried where our heroes died in the Valley of Knockanure.

 

 

 

    Oh, Walsh and Lyons and Dalton brave, although your hearts are clay,

 

    Yet in your stead we have true men yet to guard the gap today,

 

    While grass is found on Ireland’s ground your memory will endure,

 

    So God guard and keep the place you sleep and the Valley of Knockanure.